Get the key ideas from

Logistics Clusters

Delivering Value and Driving Growth

By Yossi Sheffi
18-minute read
Logistics Clusters: Delivering Value and Driving Growth by Yossi Sheffi

Logistics Clusters (2012) is the textbook for logistics operations in the modern world. You’ll learn how logistics clusters develop – such as Europe’s largest logistics park in Zaragoza, Spain – and which geographic and governmental factors influence their development. Importantly, you’ll discover exactly how logistic clusters affect both the local and global economy.

  • People involved in supply chain management and logistics
  • Entrepreneurs, business owners and politicians concerned with local business
  • Consumers curious about how a product gets from A to B globally

Yossi Sheffi is the Elisha Gray II Professor of Engineering Systems at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and director of the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics. He has also worked on supply chain problems with top logistics service providers and manufacturers.

Go Premium and get the best of Blinkist

Upgrade to Premium now and get unlimited access to the Blinkist library. Read or listen to key insights from the world’s best nonfiction.

Upgrade to Premium

What is Blinkist?

The Blinkist app gives you the key ideas from a bestselling nonfiction book in just 15 minutes. Available in bitesize text and audio, the app makes it easier than ever to find time to read.

Discover
3,000+ top
nonfiction titles

Get unlimited access to the most important ideas in business, investing, marketing, psychology, politics, and more. Stay ahead of the curve with recommended reading lists curated by experts.

Join Blinkist to get the key ideas from
Get the key ideas from
Get the key ideas from

Logistics Clusters

Delivering Value and Driving Growth

By Yossi Sheffi
  • Read in 18 minutes
  • Contains 11 key ideas
Upgrade to Premium Read or listen now
Logistics Clusters: Delivering Value and Driving Growth by Yossi Sheffi
Synopsis

Logistics Clusters (2012) is the textbook for logistics operations in the modern world. You’ll learn how logistics clusters develop – such as Europe’s largest logistics park in Zaragoza, Spain – and which geographic and governmental factors influence their development. Importantly, you’ll discover exactly how logistic clusters affect both the local and global economy.

Key idea 1 of 11

A logistics cluster makes it easier for companies to get their products from point A to point B quickly.

How exactly did your favorite pair of shoes get from the factory that produced them to the store you bought them in?

The set of operations needed to coordinate this complex chain of events is called a logistics cluster: a group of logistics-related business activities concentrated in a single geographic area.

Interestingly, different companies utilize clusters in different ways.

Zara, a Spanish clothing retailer with over 1,500 stores across the globe, uses a logistics cluster located in Zaragoza, Spain. (Although Zara was not named after Zaragoza!) The company chose this small Spanish city as the site for a major distribution center and springboard for coordinating the company’s worldwide logistics.

Why Zaragoza? Why not a fashion capital such as Paris or Milan, or some city in China that specializes in low-cost clothing production?

Zara’s distribution center is a part of Europe’s largest logistics park, called the PLAZA – or Plataforma Logística de Zaragoza – which means the logistics platform of Zaragoza.

This park boasts excellent highway, rail and air freight infrastructure, allowing Zara to deliver ready-to-sell products within 24 hours to all its European stores, and within just 48 hours, to all its stores worldwide.

Another company that benefits from PLAZA’s logistics prowess is Caladero, Spain’s largest processor and distributor of fresh fish. With its 80 fishing boats worldwide, Caladero’s distribution chain needs to be flawless: no easy task, as the company only has a few days to deliver fish to ensure freshness.

So Caladero centralizes all its distributional operations at this one site, with its optimal location and transportation infrastructure.

But how does this benefit Caladero exactly? Conveniently, Zaragoza is equidistant from Spain’s four biggest cities: Madrid, Barcelona, Valencia and Bilbao. This enables the fish company to deliver the freshest fish possible to the most customers.

Upgrade to continue Read or listen now

Key ideas in this title

Upgrade to continue Read or listen now

No time to
read?

Pssst. Sign up to your secret to success: key ideas from top nonfiction in just 15 minutes.
Created with Sketch.