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Lean UX

Applying Lean Principles to Improve User Experience

By Jeff Gothelf
12-minute read
Audio available
Lean UX: Applying Lean Principles to Improve User Experience by Jeff Gothelf

Lean UX (2013) is a guide to applying lean principles to interactive design workspaces. These blinks explain the techniques of Lean UX and outline how you can best integrate them into your company’s design process. You’ll learn the importance of close collaboration and customer feedback, as well as how to constantly improve your designs.

  • Anyone interested in how lean startup tactics apply to a design environment
  • People who want to design successful user experience more efficiently
  • Managers of design-based projects, or any professionals involved in one

Jeff Gothelf is a principal at the innovation consulting company Neo. His diverse career has included work in interactive design, a position as leader of a user experience team and even blogging. He is a highly sought-after public speaker and has led interdisciplinary teams at Publicis Modem, TheLadders and AOL.

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Lean UX

Applying Lean Principles to Improve User Experience

By Jeff Gothelf
  • Read in 12 minutes
  • Audio & text available
  • Contains 7 key ideas
Lean UX: Applying Lean Principles to Improve User Experience by Jeff Gothelf
Synopsis

Lean UX (2013) is a guide to applying lean principles to interactive design workspaces. These blinks explain the techniques of Lean UX and outline how you can best integrate them into your company’s design process. You’ll learn the importance of close collaboration and customer feedback, as well as how to constantly improve your designs.

Key idea 1 of 7

The three foundational principles of Lean UX are design thinking, agile software development and lean startup.

Do you ever see the designers that work for your company? If your business is like most, it likely keeps the design team separate from everyone else, which means that they work in their own little bubble.

Luckily there’s a way to overcome this.

It’s called Lean UX, and it connects designers to a greater collaborative process in which every team member contributes to design. Basically it’s a mix of design thinking, agile software development and lean start-up.

But what do these terms all mean?

First, design thinking is the idea that every aspect of a business can be approached with design in mind. For instance, when a company encounters an issue, it can solve it like a designer would. One key to this strategy is to involve many people when brainstorming, thereby producing more potential solutions.

Second, agile software development allows designers to deliver greater value to the customer while cutting product cycle times, which it accomplishes by involving everyone in a collaborative product development process. So, instead of a traditional approach, which would see work divided into departments, agile development means everyone working together from the start!

This strategy’s main benefits are twofold, in that many hands make light work, and since collaboration builds team spirit while fostering creativity.

The third aspect of Lean UX is the application of the lean start-up method to product design, a strategy that implies fast-paced experimentation and validation.

It works like this:

Prototypes are turned out as fast as possible to test market assumptions early on. This early testing then generates feedback almost instantly, telling you what works and what doesn’t. This way, inaccurate assumptions and weak ideas can be scrapped with little effect, freeing up the resources for your best ideas to flourish.

Now that you’ve learned the basics of Lean UX, it’s time to explore the four steps of the Lean UX cycle.

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