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Move

How Decisive Leaders Execute Strategy Despite Obstacles, Setbacks, and Stalls

By Patty Azzarello
15-minute read
Audio available
Move: How Decisive Leaders Execute Strategy Despite Obstacles, Setbacks, and Stalls by Patty Azzarello

Move (2017) provides an actionable framework for establishing long-term organizational change and introduces the MOVE model, which helps businesses overcome chronic issues ranging from employee skepticism and task prioritization to making restructuring an integral part of company culture.

  • Change agents
  • CEOs
  • Managers at all levels

Patty Azzarello, an executive, speaker, author, advisor and consultant, has more than 25 years of experience working in organizational change. At age 33, she became the youngest general manager at Hewlett-Packard. Since then, she’s led numerous successful business-transformation initiatives for companies big and small.

 

© Patty Azzarello: Move copyright 2017, John Wiley & Sons Inc. Used by permission of John Wiley & Sons Inc. and shall not be made available to any unauthorized third parties.

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Move

How Decisive Leaders Execute Strategy Despite Obstacles, Setbacks, and Stalls

By Patty Azzarello
  • Read in 15 minutes
  • Audio & text available
  • Contains 9 key ideas
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Move: How Decisive Leaders Execute Strategy Despite Obstacles, Setbacks, and Stalls by Patty Azzarello
Synopsis

Move (2017) provides an actionable framework for establishing long-term organizational change and introduces the MOVE model, which helps businesses overcome chronic issues ranging from employee skepticism and task prioritization to making restructuring an integral part of company culture.

Key idea 1 of 9

For a change initiative to work, your company needs to plan out the Middle phase.

Remember that time you decided to start jogging every morning? Remember how everything went so well at first? How, driven by the vision of a fitter, healthier existence, you sprang out of bed, put on your running shoes and clocked up a few miles?

And remember how one day of rest became two? And how two became a week? And how you don’t run at all now?

Even if you’ve never jogged a mile in your life, one thing is almost certain: you’ve experienced the Middle phase, that tedious and work-intensive period that precedes long-term results and follows the initial excitement of getting started.

Many people get bogged down in this phase, which is why dealing with it is the first concern of the MOVE model, which stands for Middle, Organization, Valor and Everyone.

So, to get through the Middle, you’ve got to stop being vague and establish small, clear and achievable targets. Here’s an example to demonstrate how this works:

Once, the author was working as a consultant for a home electronics business whose goal was as large as it was amorphous; it wanted to improve sales in Europe.

The author broke down this big, broad goal by asking two questions.

“What,” she asked, “would happen if we achieved this?” And the executives responded that they’d enjoy greater sales in one of Europe’s most important countries, Germany. “And what,” the author pressed on, “would that look like?”

Well, the executives discussed the matter, and soon some definite steps began to emerge. They’d need to hire personnel in Germany, for instance, and create partnerships with top German retailers, as well as launch advertising campaigns in the country.

In addition to making vague aims more concrete by asking these two questions, you should also keep matters urgent by defining small interim missions.

Let’s say you have a large mission – to make bigger deals, and more of them – and that you’ve resolved to close ten such deals by year’s end. Well, since people tend to put off non-urgent tasks, you’ll have to figure out a way to add urgency to this undertaking.

So set some shorter deadlines. For instance, aim to have 30 potential deals lined up in nine months, and recognize that for this to happen you need to identify 50 target accounts within half a year. These short-term goals will keep things urgent and propel you past the long-term finish line.

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