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A Team of Leaders

Empowering Every Member to Take Ownership, Demonstrate Initiative, and Deliver Results

By Paul Gustavson and Stewart Liff
10-minute read
A Team of Leaders: Empowering Every Member to Take Ownership, Demonstrate Initiative, and Deliver Results by Paul Gustavson and Stewart Liff

A Team of Leaders (2014) provides companies facing internal problems, such as lost productivity, high turnover and low employee commitment, with a powerful solution. These blinks outline practical methods and tools, including the five-stage team development model, to guide you toward an engaged and high-performance work environment.

  • People seeking to improve employee engagement in their company
  • Teams, clubs and other organizations looking to boost their performance
  • Anyone interested in workplace dynamics

Paul Gustavson is an organization design consultant and the founder of Organization Planning & Design, a company that creates and sustains high-performance teams around the world. He also coauthored The Power of Living by Design and Running into the Wind.

Stewart Liff is a human resources and visual management expert, as well as the president and CEO of his own consulting group. He is the author of several other successful books, including Managing Government Employees.

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A Team of Leaders

Empowering Every Member to Take Ownership, Demonstrate Initiative, and Deliver Results

By Paul Gustavson and Stewart Liff
  • Read in 10 minutes
  • Contains 6 key ideas
A Team of Leaders: Empowering Every Member to Take Ownership, Demonstrate Initiative, and Deliver Results by Paul Gustavson and Stewart Liff
Synopsis

A Team of Leaders (2014) provides companies facing internal problems, such as lost productivity, high turnover and low employee commitment, with a powerful solution. These blinks outline practical methods and tools, including the five-stage team development model, to guide you toward an engaged and high-performance work environment.

Key idea 1 of 6

Accomplish shared leadership in five stages.

Imagine you’re at the office and it’s midday. After 4 hours of typing and staring at a computer screen, how do you feel? In all likelihood, you’re bored stiff.

You probably have moments when you’d like to forsake your computer and incite your coworkers to join you in revolutionizing the office. You’d like to be part of a team, not a hierarchy. You want to be a member of a team of leaders.

But, as in most offices, your boss has all the decision-making power. What do you do?

Well, your workplace may simply be in the first of five stages in the team development model. Stage one is that hierarchical model we’re used to; there’s one leader and a team of subordinates following orders.

So how do you move past that stage?

First, it’s important to know what the next stage looks like.

Imagine an organization that’s agreed to strive toward developing a team of leaders. There’d no longer by one executive adjudicating on all work-related issues. Rather, every member of the team would have an equal say.

This is the stage during which change really begins. The following stages are just the ideal consequences of that initial shift.

Stage three, for instance, is when new leaders begin thinking about creating and taking responsibility for their own team, perhaps by recruiting new members.

In stage four, the transition continues as more and more team members step up to the plate and take on leadership roles. For instance, instead of waiting for an assignment from your management, you’d approach HR yourself, learn the ropes and start selecting candidates to fill open positions.

By stage five, the goal of completely shared leadership is realized, and each employee is filled with a greater sense of engagement. Because everyone now knows how to recruit people according to the company’s processes, each team is able to self-manage.

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