Open in the App Open in the App Open in the App
Get the key ideas from

Vaporized

Solid Strategies For Success in a Dematerialized World

By Robert Tercek
13-minute read
Audio available
Vaporized: Solid Strategies For Success in a Dematerialized World by Robert Tercek

Vaporized (2015) takes a hard look at the future of technology. As we move further into the digital age, it’s wise to know what to expect, including what might happen to banks, jobs and the way we do business. There’s no denying that the internet has changed our lives – and, whether we like it or not, there’s much more to come.

  • Entrepreneurs developing new online platforms
  • Executives who think the internet doesn’t affect their business
  • Tech geeks who work in the digital media industry

Robert Tercek is a media and digital expert sometimes referred to as the “TV Anarchist.” He’s worked for MTV, Sony Pictures and was president of the Oprah Winfrey Network.

Go Premium and get the best of Blinkist

Upgrade to Premium now and get unlimited access to the Blinkist library. Read or listen to key insights from the world’s best nonfiction.

Upgrade to Premium

What is Blinkist?

The Blinkist app gives you the key ideas from a bestselling nonfiction book in just 15 minutes. Available in bitesize text and audio, the app makes it easier than ever to find time to read.

Discover
3,000+ top
nonfiction titles

Get unlimited access to the most important ideas in business, investing, marketing, psychology, politics, and more. Stay ahead of the curve with recommended reading lists curated by experts.

Join Blinkist to get the key ideas from
Get the key ideas from
Get the key ideas from

Vaporized

Solid Strategies For Success in a Dematerialized World

By Robert Tercek
  • Read in 13 minutes
  • Audio & text available
  • Contains 8 key ideas
Upgrade to Premium Read or listen now
Vaporized: Solid Strategies For Success in a Dematerialized World by Robert Tercek
Synopsis

Vaporized (2015) takes a hard look at the future of technology. As we move further into the digital age, it’s wise to know what to expect, including what might happen to banks, jobs and the way we do business. There’s no denying that the internet has changed our lives – and, whether we like it or not, there’s much more to come.

Key idea 1 of 8

Information can exist in three different states: solid, liquid and vapor.

With all of our handy internet-connected devices, it’s easy to understand why today is called “the information age.” Less easy to understand is how this information behaves.

It’s helpful to think of information like water, or other chemical elements since it can exist in a variety of different states depending on how we want to use it.

To start with, information can be in a solid state, like in a book or on a CD. The downside of having information in a solid state is that it’s hard to share with more than one person.

But selling information in physical form is a convenient way to monetize it, which is another reason why keeping information in a solid state has, historically, been preferred.

Remarkably, the way we exchanged information didn’t change much at all between 1455 (when Johannes Gutenberg invented the printing press) and the recent emergence of the internet. Throughout this span of time, information was always stored in a solid state, whether as books, CDs or DVDs.

Though these physical states are durable and long-lasting ways to store information, they also demand a lot of money and energy to produce and distribute. What’s more, they eat up storage space and can only be shared one person at a time. Plus, things like laser discs quickly become obsolete.

So when the internet emerged, people didn’t hesitate to free information from its physical constraints and transform it into a more liquid state.

Imagine an ice cube beginning to melt; information, water-like, was now much easier to spread over a large area. With the click of a mouse, it was simple to post, edit and instantaneously share a file with the entire world.

But there was still another change of state in store. As information moved from desktop computers to the smartphones, it became like a vapor: fast-moving, free and constantly changing.

This is where we are now. With high-speed internet in our pockets, information is no longer bound to your office, or even to your laptop. It moves all around you, like atmospheric gasses.

No matter where or who you are, be it a scientist in a lab or a monk in a mountaintop monastery, today learning anything, at any time, is but a tap or two away.

Upgrade to continue Read or listen now

Key ideas in this title

Upgrade to continue Read or listen now

No time to
read?

Pssst. Sign up to your secret to success: key ideas from top nonfiction in just 15 minutes.
Created with Sketch.