What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should Book Summary - What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should Book explained in key points
Listen to the Intro
00:00

What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should summary

Jeffrey A. Kottler

Applications to Daily Life

4.2 (270 ratings)
14 mins

Brief summary

What You Don't Know about Leadership by Jeffrey A. Kottler is a guide to effective leadership that challenges conventional wisdom and offers new insights and strategies for aspiring leaders.

Topics
Table of Contents

    What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should
    Summary of 6 key ideas

    Audio & text in the Blinkist app
    Key idea 1 of 6

    Good leaders understand their own ignorance and respect their subordinates’ expertise.

    If you’ve been working long enough, it’s only a matter of time before you end up with a bad boss. But have you ever asked yourself what it is that makes some people so bad at leading effectively?

    One trait common to bad bosses is that they believe they know everything. Great leaders, in contrast, know that, especially in today’s chaotic, fast-changing environment, it’s impossible to know it all.

    Michael Skelly is an experienced leader, responsible for launching several successful companies focused on renewable energy. While earning his MBA at an Ivy League school, Skelly realized that, though his classmates were bright, they were often too scared to ask questions, since asking would reveal a lack of knowledge.

    At the same time, Skelly found that these classmates all respected his willingness to speak up and admit his ignorance. Skelly now incorporates this refreshing honesty into all his business dealings, and when asked about his greatest strength as a leader, he points to his ability to ask questions and admit when he doesn’t understand something.

    Skelly’s example also shows that being a humble leader is important, especially today, when more organizations are moving toward democratic and decentralized leadership structures.

    Universities and hospitals, as well as pharmaceutical and technology companies, are all favoring participatory leadership, which brings employees from every level into the decision-making process. Rather than adhering to the traditional model of having everyone obey orders passed down from on high, these organizations are implementing more democratic and collaborative structures.

    Appropriately enough, the author has found that it’s within these democratically-run organizations that know-it-all leaders are most resented.

    Doctors, professors, software engineers and scientists lodge the most complaints about bosses who stick their noses in their work. So a good leader isn’t one who barks orders or thinks they have all the right answers. A good boss knows when to stand back and trust that their staff has what it takes to make decisions and do the job they’ve been hired to do.

    Want to see all full key ideas from What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should?

    Key ideas in What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should

    More knowledge in less time
    Read or listen
    Read or listen
    Get the key ideas from nonfiction bestsellers in minutes, not hours.
    Find your next read
    Find your next read
    Get book lists curated by experts and personalized recommendations.
    Shortcasts
    Shortcasts New
    We’ve teamed up with podcast creators to bring you key insights from podcasts.

    What is What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should about?

    What You Don’t Know about Leadership, But Probably Should (2018) takes the latest research and psychological theories from the field of leadership science and explains how individuals can apply them to their daily work life. Using examples from famous leaders of all kinds, the author gives tips on how any leader can more effectively manage a team during times of conflict and stress.

    What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should Review

    What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should by Jeffrey A. Kottler (2021) offers insightful perspectives on leadership that are often overlooked. Here's why this book is worth reading:

    • By showcasing real-life stories and experiences, it provides a refreshing and relatable exploration of leadership, making it relevant and applicable to various contexts.
    • The book challenges conventional wisdom and offers new and unconventional approaches to leadership, encouraging readers to think critically and expand their understanding of effective leadership.
    • With its engaging and thought-provoking discussions on leadership, the book successfully avoids dullness, making it an enlightening and captivating read.

    Best quote from What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should

    The average adult now checks his or her phone on average every six minutes.

    —Jeffrey A. Kottler
    example alt text

    Who should read What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should?

    • People interested in workplace psychology
    • Anyone wishing to improve their leadership skills
    • Students of business management

    About the Author

    Jeffrey A. Kottler is a professor of clinical psychiatry at both Baylor College of Medicine, and California State University. He is also the founder of the Empower Nepali Girls organization, which provides mentoring for at-risk children. Amazingly, he has written around 90 books dealing with self-improvement.

    Categories with What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should

    Book summaries like What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should

    People ❤️ Blinkist 
    Sven O.

    It's highly addictive to get core insights on personally relevant topics without repetition or triviality. Added to that the apps ability to suggest kindred interests opens up a foundation of knowledge.

    Thi Viet Quynh N.

    Great app. Good selection of book summaries you can read or listen to while commuting. Instead of scrolling through your social media news feed, this is a much better way to spend your spare time in my opinion.

    Jonathan A.

    Life changing. The concept of being able to grasp a book's main point in such a short time truly opens multiple opportunities to grow every area of your life at a faster rate.

    Renee D.

    Great app. Addicting. Perfect for wait times, morning coffee, evening before bed. Extremely well written, thorough, easy to use.

    People also liked these summaries

    4.7 Stars
    Average ratings on iOS and Google Play
    30 Million
    Downloads on all platforms
    10+ years
    Experience igniting personal growth
    Powerful ideas from top nonfiction

    Try Blinkist to get the key ideas from 7,000+ bestselling nonfiction titles and podcasts. Listen or read in just 15 minutes.

    Start your free trial

    What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should FAQs 

    What is the main message of What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should?

    The main message of What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should is the importance of understanding key principles and skills to become an effective leader.

    How long does it take to read What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should?

    The reading time for What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should varies, but it typically takes several hours. The Blinkist summary can be read in just 15 minutes.

    Is What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should a good book? Is it worth reading?

    What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should is worth reading as it provides valuable insights into leadership and offers practical advice for enhancing your leadership skills.

    Who is the author of What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should?

    The author of What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should is Jeffrey A. Kottler.

    What to read after What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should?

    If you're wondering what to read next after What You Don't Know about Leadership, But Probably Should, here are some recommendations we suggest:
    • The First-Time Manager by Loren B. Belker
    • The Making of a Manager by Julie Zhuo
    • Becoming the Boss by Lindsey Pollak
    • Leadershift by John C. Maxwell
    • Leadership 101 by John C. Maxwell
    • Welcome to Management by Ryan Hawk
    • Developing the Leader Within You by John C. Maxwell
    • The 48 Laws of Power by Robert Greene
    • Everyone Deserves a Great Manager by Scott Jeffrey Miller
    • The Art of Clear Thinking by Hasard Lee