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It's the Manager

Gallup Finds the Quality of Managers and Team Leaders is the Single Biggest Factor in Your Organization's Long-term Success

By Jim Clifton, Jim Harter
13-minute read
Audio available
It's the Manager by Jim Clifton, Jim Harter

It’s the Manager (2019) outlines the latest workplace research from Gallup. It explores what good leadership looks like in the modern age, and how managers can get the best out of the people they lead.

  • Human Resources professionals seeking a fresh perspective
  • Managers looking to the future
  • Team leaders wanting to know what makes people tick

Jim Clifton is the CEO and chairman of Gallup, and the best-selling author of The Coming Jobs War. Jim Harter, PhD, is Gallup’s chief scientist of workplace management and well-being. Harter is also the coauthor of the New York Times best seller 12: The Elements of Great Managing.

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It's the Manager

Gallup Finds the Quality of Managers and Team Leaders is the Single Biggest Factor in Your Organization's Long-term Success

By Jim Clifton, Jim Harter
  • Read in 13 minutes
  • Audio & text available
  • Contains 8 key ideas
Upgrade to Premium Read or listen now
It's the Manager by Jim Clifton, Jim Harter
Synopsis

It’s the Manager (2019) outlines the latest workplace research from Gallup. It explores what good leadership looks like in the modern age, and how managers can get the best out of the people they lead.

Key idea 1 of 8

To get the best from this dynamic generation, you need to make changes to the way you run your workplace.

There’s no doubt that millennials are disrupting the way we work. These bright sparks, born between 1980 and 1996, are changing how we communicate, travel, shop, and entertain ourselves.

But, in this era of massive change, there’s a problem. The old styles of management don’t work anymore, and the approaches that suited older generations just don’t cut it.

Millennials want employers who recognize that they don’t simply come to work for a paycheck, they come to work for a purpose.

The key message here is: To get the best from this dynamic generation, you need to make changes to the way you run your workplace.

Younger workers need meaning in their jobs, and want to work for companies that make a positive impact on the world. Whereas their baby boomer parents found meaning through family and within their communities, millennials and Generation Z find their purpose through work. So if you want to attract and retain the best people, you need to build a workplace culture around making a difference.

Millennials also aren’t very interested in job satisfaction in the typical sense. What they really care about is career progression. They’re not swayed by the foosball tables and luxury coffee machines that many companies now offer as standard. In fact, they find these perks patronizing. What millennials want is for you to help them move up the career ladder. They don’t care whether or not you give them a free lunch.

It may come as a surprise to learn that most millennials don’t really want you to manage them at all, they would much rather that you coach them. Instead of an old-fashioned boss who controls and commands, younger employees want leaders who understand their strengths, and can help build on them so they get better at their jobs.

And traditional bosses aren’t all that millennials are rejecting. As it turns out, they don’t want annual performance reviews, either. Instead, they want much more regular feedback from their managers – which makes sense, given that millennials and Generation Z are used to instant communication through things like texts and tweets. Just remember to focus on their strengths, not their weaknesses. Millennials like to know what they’re doing well so that they can do more of it.

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