Kategorien entdecken

In der App öffnen In der App öffnen In der App öffnen
Das sind die Blinks zu

What’s Going on in There?

How the Brain and Mind Develop in the First Five Years of Life

Von Lise Eliot
16 Minuten
Audio-Version verfügbar
What’s Going on in There?: How the Brain and Mind Develop in the First Five Years of Life von Lise Eliot

What’s Going on in There? (1999) delves into the cognitive and physiological development of young children. These blinks explain the most important milestones of a child’s development, exploring the shared influence of genes and parenting on children.

  • New parents or parents-to-be
  • Teachers and caregivers curious about infant psychology
  • Anyone who’s ever wondered what babies think about

Lise Eliot is a neuroscientist and professor at the Chicago Medical School. As a writer, she is known for her contributions to the magazine Slate, as well as her book Pink Brain, Blue Brain: How Small Differences Grow into Troublesome Gaps and What We Can Do About It.

Kennst du schon Blinkist Premium?

Mit Blinkist Premium erhältst du Zugang zu dem Wichtigsten aus mehr als 3.000 Sachbuch-Bestsellern. Das Probeabo ist 100% kostenlos.

Premium kostenlos testen

Was ist Blinkist?

Blinkist ist eine App, die die großen Ideen der besten Sachbücher in einprägsame Kurztexte verpackt und erklärt. Die Inhalte der über 3.000 Titel starken Bibliothek reichen von Sachbuch-Klassikern, über populäre Ratgeber bis hin zu diskutierten Neuerscheinungen. Basierend auf wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnissen wird jeder Titel von speziell geschulten Autoren aufbereitet und dem Nutzer als Kurztext und Audiotitel zur Verfügung gestellt.

Discover
3.000+ top
nonfiction titles

Get unlimited access to the most important ideas in business, investing, marketing, psychology, politics, and more. Stay ahead of the curve with recommended reading lists curated by experts.

Entdecke die Kernaussagen zu diesem Titel:
Entdecke die Kernaussagen zu diesem Titel:
Entdecke die Kernaussagen zu diesem Titel:

What’s Going on in There?

How the Brain and Mind Develop in the First Five Years of Life

Von Lise Eliot
  • Lesedauer: 16 Minuten
  • Verfügbar in Text & Audio
  • 10 Kernaussagen
Jetzt kostenloses Probeabo starten Jetzt lesen oder anhören
What’s Going on in There?: How the Brain and Mind Develop in the First Five Years of Life von Lise Eliot
Worum geht's

What’s Going on in There? (1999) delves into the cognitive and physiological development of young children. These blinks explain the most important milestones of a child’s development, exploring the shared influence of genes and parenting on children.

Kernaussage 1 von 10

Genetic predisposition and childhood experiences influence an infant’s development.

Picture a ball rolling down a hill. Gravity is pulling the ball downward, but its path might be diverted or changed by a rock or two in its path. Human development works a little like this. The main direction of our development is determined by our genes, but other factors can change the direction of our development, too.

Just 18 weeks after fertilization, the building blocks of a human embryo’s brain are already formed, following a sequence determined by our genes. Our brains begin by first developing the components and capabilities essential to keep us alive, such as controlling our heart rate. More complex components, like those required for imagination and memory, form later on.

Genes also shape the way these different parts of the brain communicate with each other. Neurons connect when our genes cause chemical attractants to be released at the right place and the right time inside our brains.

But after birth, genes aren’t the only factors in human development. Between the ages of one and eight, children produce twice the number of neuronal connections required for healthy brain functionality. Because of this, efficient pathways for cognitive processes must be established, and for their brains to do this, children need nurture.

This need for nurture is critical – if children lack stimulation, the neuronal connections they need for healthy adult life will deteriorate rapidly. This has been known to psychiatrists since the 1940s, when René Spitz conducted an experiment comparing two groups of children.  

Children in the first group had been raised by their mothers in prison, while those in the second group had been taken from their mothers and raised in a nearby nursery. Children who’d grown up in the prison developed normally, thanks to their mothers’ care.

But the children in the nursery, who had been growing up without human contact and intellectually stimulating play, suffered the consequences. Their neuronal connections degenerated, and many developed retardations that impeded their ability to walk and talk by the time they reached the age of three.

Mit Premium freischalten Jetzt lesen oder anhören

Inhalt

Mit Premium freischalten Jetzt lesen oder anhören

Bringe mehr Wissen in deinen Alltag!

Sichere dir jetzt Zugang zu den Kernaussagen der besten Sachbücher – praktisch in Text & Audio in nur 15 Minuten pro Titel.
Created with Sketch.