Blinkracy Book Summary - Blinkracy Book explained in key points
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Blinkracy summary

Ben Hughes and Sebastian Klein

Make Your Company Management-Free and 100% Results-Oriented

3.8 (12 ratings)
15 mins

Brief summary

Blinkracy by Ben Hughes & Sebastian Klein explores the concept of creating change rapidly in the workplace by taking decisive action and making informed decisions based on intuition. The authors argue that this can be more effective than relying solely on analytical thinking.

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    Blinkracy
    Summary of 6 key ideas

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    Key idea 1 of 6

    Classic command and control organizations are antiquated, dysfunctional and ineffective.

    Like most companies in the world, your workplace is probably organized according to a rigid hierarchy: Employees do whatever their bosses tell them. In turn, these bosses have their own bosses. So in effect, mandates from the highest tiers of management trickle down to each employee.

    This top-down hierarchy is called command and control (C&C), and it’s based on the antiquated idea that companies work best when a hoard of uneducated minions carries out the orders of one genius leader (like Rockefeller or Vanderbilt). Companies have been organized in the same non-motivating way ever since the coal mines and factories of the Industrial Revolution.

    But today, these old business structures don’t suit the fast-changing business landscape. Why fast-changing? Well, a Yale University study showed that the average American company’s lifespan has decreased from 67 years to a trifling 15.

    That means businesses have to be capable of adapting – and quickly!

    Eastman Kodak learned this lesson the hard way: The iconic photography company, founded in the late 19th century, the heyday of C&C, didn’t respond fast enough to the rise of digital cameras in the 1990s. And as a result, they filed for bankruptcy in 2012.

    As you can see, rigidity is a major disadvantage of C&C. But it’s not the only one! Poor talent management and poisonous office politics also undermine these kinds of hierarchical workplaces.

    Why?

    Well, in C&C systems, a few managers have the authority to hire and fire at will. So people often get promoted not because of merit but because they play golf with the boss.

    To be successful, however, organizations need to have the most capable and skillful people filling each role. And that’s why having a culture of promotions based on connections – not skills – damages a company’s prospects.

    Although C&C is a dysfunctional system, it’s still the dominant way of organizing the workplace. So is it any wonder that 71 percent of American employees dislike their jobs?

    There has to be a better way of organizing companies without descending into anarchy.

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    What is Blinkracy about?

    Blinkracy (2015) is all about an innovative organizational approach based on empowering employees and eliminating the need for managers. With insights from the Berlin-based startup Blinkist, which restructured its own workplace using this model, these blinks describe how you can implement it at your own firm.

    Blinkracy Review

    Blinkracy (2021) explores the art of making split-second decisions in an uncertain world, offering valuable insights into the power of rapid cognition. Here's why this book is definitely worth reading:

    • Packed with fascinating anecdotes and real-life examples, it sheds light on how our minds can make accurate judgments in the blink of an eye.
    • By delving into the science behind intuitive thinking, it provides readers with a practical framework for honing their decision-making skills and trusting their gut instincts.
    • The book's thought-provoking ideas challenge conventional wisdom, keeping readers engaged and encouraging them to think differently about the way they make choices.

    Best quote from Blinkracy

    Command and control systems are unpleasant for all, except the cigar-smoking, top-hat wearing, monocle-wiping owner at the top.

    —Ben Hughes and Sebastian Klein
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    Who should read Blinkracy?

    • Executives who want their business to be more organic and flexible
    • Startup founders who want to get things right from the very beginning
    • Consultants interested in how to best organize a workplace in the modern business landscape

    About the Author

    Sebastian Klein is co-founder of, and Editor-in-Chief at Blinkist. He was formerly a consultant to the Boston Consulting Group and a serial entrepreneur. He specializes in knife skills and once rode a bicycle across Kuala Lumpur with no handlebars.

    Ben Hughes is the Head of Content at Blinkist. He is a former management consultant, with expertise in corporate strategy and psychology. In 2013, Finland Licorice Weekly named him in their “Top 50” and he currently holds the record for most comments on a Google Doc, an incredible 439 comments on just three pages.

    Blinkist is a Berlin startup specializing in distilling complex concepts from great books into easy-to-understand fifteen-minute packs.

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    Blinkracy FAQs 

    What is the main message of Blinkracy?

    The main message of Blinkracy is about the power of making quick decisions and trusting our intuition in a fast-paced world.

    How long does it take to read Blinkracy?

    The reading time for Blinkracy varies depending on the reader's speed. However, the Blinkist summary can be read in just 15 minutes.

    Is Blinkracy a good book? Is it worth reading?

    Blinkracy is a valuable read for anyone looking to enhance their decision-making skills. It provides practical insights and strategies to navigate the complexities of today's world.

    Who is the author of Blinkracy?

    The authors of Blinkracy are Ben Hughes and Sebastian Klein.

    What to read after Blinkracy?

    If you're wondering what to read next after Blinkracy, here are some recommendations we suggest:
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