The Nazi Conspiracy Book Summary - The Nazi Conspiracy Book explained in key points
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The Nazi Conspiracy summary

Brad Meltzer and Josh Mensch

The Secret Plot to Kill Roosevelt, Stalin, and Churchill

4.6 (285 ratings)
15 mins
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    The Nazi Conspiracy
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    Coming Together

    “Unconditional surrender.”

    These are the words that Roosevelt uses in Morocco at the beginning of 1943, in the press conference for his one-on-one meeting with Churchill. For the rest of the world, this is a shocking announcement – a public pledge that the Nazis won’t have the opportunity to negotiate for peace; that the war will go on to the bitter end.

    The British prime minister is also shocked – he didn’t know the president was going to go public with this significant decision. Due to his friendship with Roosevelt and the necessity to present a unified front, he decides in the moment to echo the weighty words. The allied forces will accept nothing less than unconditional surrender.

    The Morocco conference is a huge step forward in both strategic planning and public image for the Allies. But Roosevelt feels that the meeting has been a failure. A key element was missing: the third Allied leader, Joseph Stalin.

    The Soviet leader desperately wants his US and British allies to launch an attack from the west, through Northern France. This would draw the German Army away from the bloody Eastern Front, potentially giving the Allied forces the chance to close in on Berlin from both sides.

    Although Churchill isn’t openly against the idea, he repeatedly postpones or rejects specific plans in favor of focusing on the “soft underbelly” of Italy. Rather than allow Britain to take the greatest risk in a cross-channel attack, he’d rather offer support by weakening and fortifying the southern regions.

    This has been frustrating Stalin, whose forces have already been taking by far the greatest number of casualties.

    Roosevelt knows that the three leaders have to get together – to appease Stalin, encourage Churchill, and move the war forward. He begins a series of letter exchanges with Stalin in the hope that such a meeting can be arranged.

    In the end, it’s a series of military escalations that move things forward. First, a mixture of British and Soviet intelligence reveals and prevents a covert German attack before it happens, and then the British and US troops attack Sicily, eventually leading to the arrest of the Italian fascist leader Benito Mussolini.

    In the wake of these victories, Roosevelt takes the opportunity to appease the Soviet leader with flattery and arms shipments. Finally, Stalin agrees that a meeting of the “big three” is well overdue. After another lengthy exchange of letters, he even suggests the location: Tehran, the capital city of Ally-controlled Iran.

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    What is The Nazi Conspiracy about?

    The Nazi Conspiracy (2023) tells the thrilling true story of the first meeting between the leaders of the Allied forces during the height of World War II – and the top-secret Nazi plot that almost changed the course of history. Full of drama, twists, and political intrigue stretching all over the world, it shows how the three leaders – Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Joseph Stalin – defied all odds, and arranged one of the most pivotal events in the entire war.

    Who should read The Nazi Conspiracy?

    • World War II buffs looking for a deep exploration of one of the lesser-known developments of the war 
    • Armchair historians interested in the small events that changed the world
    • Anyone who loves political drama, intrigue, and a good spy story

    About the Author

    Brad Meltzer is the best-selling author of many political and historical thrillers, including The Lightning Rod and The Escape Artist. He also hosts Brad Meltzer’s Decoded and Brad Meltzer’s Lost History on the History Channel, through which he helped find the missing 9/11 flag which the firefighters had raised at Ground Zero.

    Josh Mensch is a best-selling author and producer of American history television documentaries. Alongside Brad Meltzer, he’s coauthored other historical conspiracy books including The First Conspiracy and The Lincoln Conspiracy.

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