Kategorien entdecken

Das sind die Blinks zu

A Peace to End All Peace

The Fall of the Ottoman Empire and Creation of the Modern Middle East

Von David Fromkin
21 Minuten
Audio-Version verfügbar
A Peace to End All Peace: The Fall of the Ottoman Empire and Creation of the Modern Middle East von David Fromkin

The Middle East today is a hotbed of violence and war. Whether the civil war in Syria or the intractable Arab-Israeli conflict, peace in the region seems a far-off dream. Yet how did the Middle East become so unstable? In A Peace to End All Peace (1989), you’ll learn that European colonial ambitions during World War I were the catalyst that led to today’s modern crises.

This is a Blinkist staff pick

“This book in blinks provides a comprehensive and compelling account of the recent history of the Middle East. It offers an interesting starting point for understanding the reasons behind current issues in the region.”

– John, Customer Support Agent at Blinkist

  • Anyone interested in understanding the Middle East
  • Political junkies
  • Students of history or international relations

David Fromkin is Professor Emeritus in International Relations at Boston University. Before becoming a historian, he worked as a lawyer and political advisor. His many books include Europe’s Last Summer and The King and the Cowboy.

Kennst du schon Blinkist Premium?

Mit Blinkist Premium erhältst du Zugang zu dem Wichtigsten aus mehr als 3.000 Sachbuch-Bestsellern. Das Probeabo ist 100% kostenlos.

Premium kostenlos testen

Was ist Blinkist?

Blinkist ist eine App, die die großen Ideen der besten Sachbücher in einprägsame Kurztexte verpackt und erklärt. Die Inhalte der über 3.000 Titel starken Bibliothek reichen von Sachbuch-Klassikern, über populäre Ratgeber bis hin zu diskutierten Neuerscheinungen. Basierend auf wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnissen wird jeder Titel von speziell geschulten Autoren aufbereitet und dem Nutzer als Kurztext und Audiotitel zur Verfügung gestellt.

Discover
3.000+ top
nonfiction titles

Get unlimited access to the most important ideas in business, investing, marketing, psychology, politics, and more. Stay ahead of the curve with recommended reading lists curated by experts.

Entdecke die Kernaussagen zu diesem Titel:
Entdecke die Kernaussagen zu diesem Titel:
Entdecke die Kernaussagen zu diesem Titel:

A Peace to End All Peace

The Fall of the Ottoman Empire and Creation of the Modern Middle East

Von David Fromkin
  • Lesedauer: 21 Minuten
  • Verfügbar in Text & Audio
  • 13 Kernaussagen
Jetzt kostenloses Probeabo starten Jetzt lesen oder anhören
A Peace to End All Peace: The Fall of the Ottoman Empire and Creation of the Modern Middle East von David Fromkin
Worum geht's

The Middle East today is a hotbed of violence and war. Whether the civil war in Syria or the intractable Arab-Israeli conflict, peace in the region seems a far-off dream. Yet how did the Middle East become so unstable? In A Peace to End All Peace (1989), you’ll learn that European colonial ambitions during World War I were the catalyst that led to today’s modern crises.

This is a Blinkist staff pick

“This book in blinks provides a comprehensive and compelling account of the recent history of the Middle East. It offers an interesting starting point for understanding the reasons behind current issues in the region.”

– John, Customer Support Agent at Blinkist

Kernaussage 1 von 13

At the turn of the twentieth century, the Ottoman Empire had long been in decline.

By the turn of the twentieth century, the progress resulting from the Industrial Revolution had pushed the countries of Western Europe to grow both economically and technologically.

The Ottoman Empire, meanwhile, was called “the sick man of Europe.”

The empire was a caliphate, or an Islamic monarchy, based not on nationality but religion. In other words, while the empire was ethnically diverse, the majority of its population was Muslim.

Religion played a central role in peoples’ daily lives. Even for the empire’s minority Christian and Jewish groups, identity was synonymous with religion.

For people in western Europe, however, the Ottoman Empire seemed like a museum, with its subjects’ daily lives frozen in a past century. Constantinople introduced electric street lights only in 1912, for example – an innovation long common in major European cities.

Compared to European empires such as those of France or Britain, Ottoman political power didn’t extend much beyond the immediate Turkish heartland, covering only a small fraction of the empire.

European visitors wondered at the empire’s organization, observing that the vast majority of non-Turkish provinces were self-governed, despite the presence of Ottoman military troops.

This political arrangement did little to help the Ottomans hold territory. By the early twentieth century, the empire had lost significant areas to encroaching European interests.

In October 1912, Italy claimed the Ottoman Empire’s only remaining African territory, in what is now Libya. By that time, the majority of its southeastern European territories located in the Balkans, in Greece and in Bulgaria had also been lost.

So by the start of World War I, all that was left of the great Ottoman Empire was modern-day Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, Iraq, Syria and much of the Arabian peninsula.

Mit Premium freischalten Jetzt lesen oder anhören

Inhalt

Mit Premium freischalten Jetzt lesen oder anhören

Bringe mehr Wissen in deinen Alltag!

Sichere dir jetzt Zugang zu den Kernaussagen der besten Sachbücher – praktisch in Text & Audio in nur 15 Minuten pro Titel.
Created with Sketch.