The best 61 Schools books

Schools play a crucial role in shaping our understanding of the world and preparing us for the future. Our curated book list on schools sheds light on various facets of the education system, offering valuable insights into its challenges, innovations, and impact on society.

Dive into our comprehensive collection to gain a deeper appreciation for the complexities of education and its profound influence. Ready to broaden your perspectives and discover the transformative power of learning?

The best 61 Schools books
How do we create content on this page?
1
Schools Books: Learn or Die by Edward D. Hess

Learn or Die

Edward D. Hess
Using Science to Build a Leading-Edge Learning Organization
4.1 (58 ratings)
Listen to the Intro
00:00

What's Learn or Die about?

Learn or Die (2014) makes a strong case for personal and organizational learning as a survival tool in today’s fast-paced business world. Full of practical tips, the book presents a framework for how individuals and organizations can create an environment that fosters life-long learning.

Who should read Learn or Die?

  • Team leaders, managers, CEOs and entrepreneurs
  • Career-minded employees looking to improve overall skills
  • Managers who want to build a learning organization

2
Schools Books: A Bigger Prize by Margaret Heffernan

A Bigger Prize

Margaret Heffernan
How We Can Do Better Than the Competition
3.6 (10 ratings)
Listen to the Intro
00:00

What's A Bigger Prize about?

A Bigger Prize (2014) explains how competition is holding us back. These blinks demonstrate how our competitive schools, economy and society – believed to produce higher grades, lower prices and better results – are actually stifling collaboration and preventing us from realizing our full potential.

Who should read A Bigger Prize?

  • Professionals who work with colleagues
  • Anyone who is into sports
  • People interested in the downside of competition

3
Schools Books: Creative Schools by Ken Robinson and Lou Aronica

Creative Schools

Ken Robinson and Lou Aronica
Revolutionizing Education from the Ground Up
4.5 (169 ratings)
Listen to the Intro
00:00

What's Creative Schools about?

Creative Schools (2015) is a guide to transforming education. These blinks break down every aspect of education from its history to the essential needs of students. They also illustrate the ways in which all people can help kids get the schooling they need to succeed in a rapidly transforming world.

Who should read Creative Schools?

  • Teachers, students and parents
  • Anyone interested in education
  • Anyone who wants a new way of teaching that truly prepares kids for the big challenges to come

4
Schools Books: The Importance of Being Little by Erika Christakis

The Importance of Being Little

Erika Christakis
What Preschoolers Really Need From Grown-Ups
3.9 (25 ratings)
Listen to the Intro
00:00

What's The Importance of Being Little about?

The Importance of Being LIttle (2016) is all about the powerful and curious minds of children, and the way our current preschool educational standards of testing and standardized worksheets limit their natural skills. These blinks explain why a focus on the personal development of each child is a much better strategy.

Who should read The Importance of Being Little?

  • Parents curious about alternatives to the current American preschool system
  • Anyone interested in early childhood development and education

5
Schools Books: Why Don’t Students Like School? by Daniel T. Willingham

Why Don’t Students Like School?

Daniel T. Willingham
A Cognitive Scientist Answers Questions About How the Mind Works and What It Means for the Classroom
4.3 (141 ratings)
Listen to the Intro
00:00

What's Why Don’t Students Like School? about?

Why Don’t Students Like School? (2009) seeks to explain the brain’s most important processes relating to memory, learning and intelligence. A stronger understanding of these mechanisms will enable all educators to train themselves in better teaching methods and result in more engaging and effective educational programs.

Who should read Why Don’t Students Like School??

  • Parents wanting to ensure their children succeed at school
  • Educators and teachers hoping to hone their craft
  • Forgetful people trying to improve their memory recall

6
Schools Books: Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government by Robert T. Kiyosaki

Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government

Robert T. Kiyosaki
Rich Dad's Guide to Financial Education for Parents
4.3 (406 ratings)
Listen to the Intro
00:00

What's Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government about?

Why “A” Students Work For “C” Students And “B” Students Work For The Government (2013) explains how the global financial crisis we face today is really a crisis of education. Schools are failing to provide students with even the most fundamental financial education. It’s up to parents to teach their children about real-world financial responsibility. 

Who should read Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government?

  • Parents who want to give their children the basis for a sound financial education
  • Anyone who has wondered why schools don’t teach students about money
  • Fans of Rich Dad Poor Dad

7
Schools Books: Better Together by Lydia Dobyns and Tom Vander Ark

Better Together

Lydia Dobyns and Tom Vander Ark
How to Leverage School Networks for Smarter Personalized and Project Based Learning
4.4 (16 ratings)
Listen to the Intro
00:00

What's Better Together about?

Better Together (2018) is an examination of how school networks are transforming students’ education experiences across the United States to make them college and career ready. It illuminates how networks provide new learning models, foster ongoing professional development, and facilitate personalized education to help each child reach their full potential.

Who should read Better Together?

  • Educators establishing new schools with nontraditional learning models
  • School leaders wanting to increase student engagement levels and performance
  • District superintendents looking to innovate learning

8
Schools Books: The Case Against Education by Bryan Caplan

The Case Against Education

Bryan Caplan
Why the Education System Is a Waste of Time and Money
3.8 (194 ratings)
Listen to the Intro
00:00

What's The Case Against Education about?

The Case Against Education (2018) takes orthodox opinion about education and turns it on its head. It argues that, far from turning students into skillful and productive workers, education serves primarily to verify employable character traits. Using this insight as its central premise, it goes on to argue that education needs to be substantially reformed.

Who should read The Case Against Education?

  • Public-policy buffs interested in educational reform
  • Teachers and educators willing to engage with shocking ideas
  • Young people wondering if college is for them

9
Schools Books: Grasp by Sanjay Sarma, Luke Yoquinto

Grasp

Sanjay Sarma, Luke Yoquinto
The Science Transforming How We Learn
4.1 (195 ratings)
Listen to the Intro
00:00

What's Grasp about?

Grasp (2020) covers the development of modern education systems and the ways in which their current forms conflict with recent scientific insights into how the brain works. It describes a variety of experimental techniques being applied to improve education and discusses how they might become more broadly generalized.

Who should read Grasp?

  • Academics, teachers, school administrators 
  • Students
  • Anyone interested in improving their own ability to learn

10
Schools Books: Thrivers by Michele Borba

Thrivers

Michele Borba
The Surprising Reasons Why Some Kids Struggle and Others Shine
4.4 (218 ratings)
Listen to the Intro
00:00

What's Thrivers about?

Thrivers (2021) is a study of what it means to be a child in today’s fast-paced, ultra-competitive, and digital world. Kids are achieving more and more, but they’ve never felt so lonely and stressed. In our rush to prepare them for an uncertain future, we’ve taught them to strive for accolades but forgotten that there’s more to success – and happiness – than test scores and grades. What’s missing is an emphasis on helping them thrive.

Who should read Thrivers?

  • Parents worried about their kids’ futures
  • Teachers on the frontlines of our burnout-inducing education system
  • Psychologists interested in child development

11
Schools Books: The Family Firm by Emily Oster

The Family Firm

Emily Oster
A Data-Driven Guide to Better Decision Making in the Early School Years
4.0 (65 ratings)
Listen to the Intro
00:00

What's The Family Firm about?

The Family Firm (2021) explores the latest research on pre-teen child development. It explains how parents can make data-driven decisions on important parenting decisions like a child’s school, bedtime, diet, and extracurricular schedule.

Who should read The Family Firm?

  • Parents of children ages five to twelve
  • Educators looking for a fresh perspective
  • Psychology buffs seeking new insights

12
Schools Books: What Your ADHD Child Wishes You Knew by Sharon Saline

What Your ADHD Child Wishes You Knew

Sharon Saline
Working Together to Empower Kids for Success in School and Life
4.6 (75 ratings)
Listen to the Intro
00:00

What's What Your ADHD Child Wishes You Knew about?

What Your ADHD Child Wishes You Knew (2018) provides parents with insights into the challenges and experiences of children with ADHD. It focuses on the importance of communication and collaboration between parents and children, and outlines the Five Cs that will help you help your child with ADHD. Learn the skills you need to ensure your child flourishes with the brain they have.

Who should read What Your ADHD Child Wishes You Knew?

  • Parents of children with ADHD
  • Teens and adults with ADHD
  • Teachers and parents

13
Schools Books: All Souls by Michael Patrick MacDonald

All Souls

Michael Patrick MacDonald
A Family Story from Southie

What's All Souls about?

All Souls is a memoir by Michael Patrick MacDonald that tells the story of his childhood in South Boston during the 1970s and 1980s. It explores the impact of poverty, crime, and violence on his family and community, as well as his journey to break free from the cycle of poverty and find hope and redemption. It is a powerful and heartbreaking account of life in an impoverished neighborhood and the resilience of the human spirit.

Who should read All Souls?

  • Individuals seeking a deep understanding of the social issues affecting marginalized communities
  • Readers interested in personal memoirs that shed light on the complexities of poverty and crime
  • Activists and advocates for social justice looking for inspiration and a call to action

14
Schools Books: Breaking Night by Liz Murray

Breaking Night

Liz Murray
A Memoir of Forgiveness, Survival, and My Journey from Homeless to Harvard

What's Breaking Night about?

Breaking Night is a memoir by Liz Murray that tells the inspiring story of her journey from a troubled childhood to becoming a successful student at Harvard University. Murray shares her experiences of homelessness, drug-addicted parents, and the challenges she faced in pursuit of education. It is a powerful and uplifting tale of resilience and determination.

Who should read Breaking Night?

  • Individuals looking for inspirational stories of perseverance and resilience
  • Those interested in understanding the struggles faced by individuals in poverty
  • Readers who want to gain insights into overcoming adversity and achieving personal and professional success

15
Schools Books: Brother, I'm Dying by Edwidge Danticat

Brother, I'm Dying

Edwidge Danticat

What's Brother, I'm Dying about?

"Brother, I'm Dying" is a memoir by Edwidge Danticat that tells the story of her family's experiences in Haiti and the United States. It explores themes of immigration, family bonds, and the challenges faced by those seeking a better life. The book offers a poignant and powerful reflection on love, loss, and the complexities of the human experience.

Who should read Brother, I'm Dying?

  • People interested in the immigrant experience and the challenges faced by immigrants
  • Readers who enjoy memoirs and personal narratives
  • Those who appreciate poignant storytelling and reflections on family, identity, and resilience

16
Schools Books: Chinese Cinderella by Adeline Yen Mah

Chinese Cinderella

Adeline Yen Mah
The True Story of an Unwanted Daughter

What's Chinese Cinderella about?

Chinese Cinderella is a memoir by Adeline Yen Mah that tells the story of her difficult childhood in China. Born the fifth child to an affluent family, Adeline is treated as an unwanted daughter and faces emotional and physical abuse from her stepmother. Despite the hardships, she finds solace in her love for literature and eventually overcomes adversity to achieve success. This poignant and inspiring book sheds light on the power of resilience and the importance of pursuing one's dreams.

Who should read Chinese Cinderella?

  • Readers interested in stories of resilience and overcoming adversity
  • Individuals curious about Chinese culture and history
  • People seeking inspiration and motivation to overcome their own challenges

17
Schools Books: Culturally Responsive Teaching and The Brain by Zaretta Lynn Hammond

Culturally Responsive Teaching and The Brain

Zaretta Lynn Hammond
Promoting Authentic Engagement and Rigor Among Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students

What's Culturally Responsive Teaching and The Brain about?

This book explores the intersection of neuroscience and culturally responsive teaching, offering practical strategies for educators to create an inclusive and engaging learning environment for all students. Drawing on research and real-life examples, Zaretta Lynn Hammond provides insights into how students' cultural backgrounds and experiences can impact their learning, and offers tools to help teachers leverage this knowledge to support their students' academic success. It is a valuable resource for educators looking to enhance their teaching practices and promote equity in the classroom.

Who should read Culturally Responsive Teaching and The Brain?

  • Educators who want to create a more inclusive and supportive classroom environment
  • Individuals interested in understanding how cultural backgrounds impact learning and behavior
  • Teachers looking for practical strategies to engage students from diverse backgrounds

18
Schools Books: Euthyphro by Plato

Euthyphro

Plato

What's Euthyphro about?

Euthyphro is a philosophical dialogue written by Plato, in which Socrates engages in a debate with Euthyphro about the nature of piety and the definition of holiness. Through their discussion, the book explores the concepts of morality, ethics, and the relationship between the gods and human actions. It challenges readers to critically examine their own beliefs and values.

Who should read Euthyphro?

  • Philosophy enthusiasts seeking a deeper understanding of ethical dilemmas
  • Students or scholars of ancient Greek philosophy
  • Individuals interested in exploring the foundations of moral reasoning and morality

19
Schools Books: Funny in Farsi by Firoozeh Dumas

Funny in Farsi

Firoozeh Dumas
A Memoir of Growing Up Iranian in America

What's Funny in Farsi about?

Funny in Farsi is a memoir that tells the story of Firoozeh Dumas, an Iranian immigrant, and her experiences growing up in America. Through a series of humorous and heartwarming anecdotes, Dumas offers a unique perspective on cultural differences, family dynamics, and the challenges of assimilation. With wit and charm, she shares her journey of finding a sense of belonging in a new country while staying true to her Iranian heritage. It's a delightful and insightful book that celebrates the beauty of diversity and the universal language of laughter.

Who should read Funny in Farsi?

  • People interested in humorous memoirs that provide insight into different cultures
  • Readers who enjoy stories of personal growth and adaptation
  • Individuals looking for a lighthearted and entertaining read

20
Schools Books: Train Go Sorry by Leah Hager Cohen

Train Go Sorry

Leah Hager Cohen
Inside a Deaf World

What's Train Go Sorry about?

"Train Go Sorry" is a memoir by Leah Hager Cohen that delves into the world of the Lexington School for the Deaf in New York City. Through personal anecdotes and interviews, Cohen explores the challenges and triumphs of the deaf community, shedding light on the complexities of communication and the importance of understanding and acceptance. It offers a unique perspective on deaf culture and the power of language.

Who should read Train Go Sorry?

  • People interested in the experiences of the deaf community
  • Individuals curious about the challenges faced by deaf students in mainstream education
  • Readers who appreciate personal narratives that shed light on the power of communication and understanding

21
Schools Books: White Teacher by Vivian Gussin Paley

White Teacher

Vivian Gussin Paley

What's White Teacher about?

In "White Teacher," Vivian Gussin Paley shares her experiences as a white teacher in a predominantly black kindergarten classroom. She reflects on the challenges and complexities of race, identity, and education, offering valuable insights and lessons for educators and parents alike. Through personal anecdotes and thoughtful analysis, Paley encourages us to confront our own biases and strive for a more inclusive and equitable learning environment.

Who should read White Teacher?

  • Teachers and educators looking to improve their teaching methods
  • Parents who want to better understand the dynamics of a diverse classroom
  • Individuals interested in the intersection of race, education, and empathy

22
Schools Books: Symposium by Plato

Symposium

Plato

What's Symposium about?

Symposium is a philosophical text written by Plato, which takes the form of a dialogue between various characters. The book explores the nature of love and its place in society, as well as the different forms of love and their significance. Through thought-provoking discussions and arguments, Plato delves into the complexities of human relationships and the pursuit of wisdom. It is a timeless work that continues to inspire and challenge readers to contemplate the nature of love and its role in our lives.

Who should read Symposium?

  • Philosophy students and enthusiasts seeking to explore the nature of love and its implications
  • Readers interested in understanding the concepts of beauty, desire, and the pursuit of wisdom
  • Individuals curious about the ancient Greek society and its intellectual discourse

What's The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber about?

The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber is a gripping short story by Ernest Hemingway that delves into themes of courage, masculinity, and the complexities of human relationships. Set in the African savannah, the story follows the wealthy and timid Francis Macomber as he embarks on a hunting expedition with his wife and their experienced guide. As the events unfold, the story explores the dynamics between the characters and ultimately reveals the true nature of bravery and redemption. Hemingway's masterful storytelling and vivid descriptions make this a compelling read.

Who should read The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber?

  • Readers who enjoy exploring complex human psychology through fiction
  • Those interested in themes of courage, fear, and the pursuit of satisfaction
  • Individuals who appreciate Hemingway's concise and evocative writing style

What's In the Time of the Butterflies about?

This novel tells the story of the Mirabal sisters, who were involved in the resistance against the dictatorship of Rafael Trujillo in the Dominican Republic. Through their individual perspectives, the book explores themes of courage, sacrifice, and the fight for freedom. It is a powerful and inspiring tale of sisterhood and political activism.

Who should read In the Time of the Butterflies?

  • Readers interested in historical fiction based on real events
  • Those who appreciate stories about strong, resilient women
  • People wanting to learn about the impact of political and social upheaval on individuals

What's The Trial and Death of Socrates about?

This book is a philosophical dialogue written by Plato, recounting the trial and eventual execution of the ancient Greek philosopher Socrates. Through thought-provoking conversations, it explores Socrates' defense of his beliefs and his unwavering commitment to truth and justice, making it a timeless examination of the nature of knowledge, morality, and the pursuit of wisdom.

Who should read The Trial and Death of Socrates?

  • Readers who are interested in philosophy and the teachings of Socrates
  • Individuals looking to expand their understanding of ancient Greek philosophy
  • Those who appreciate thought-provoking discussions on ethics and justice

26
Schools Books: Warriors Don't Cry by Melba Pattillo Beals

Warriors Don't Cry

Melba Pattillo Beals
A Searing Memoir of the Battle to Integrate Little Rock's Central High

What's Warriors Don't Cry about?

This memoir tells the powerful story of Melba Pattillo Beals, one of the Little Rock Nine, who bravely fought against segregation in the 1950s. Through her firsthand account, she shares the challenges and triumphs of being one of the first black students to integrate an all-white high school in Arkansas. Warriors Don't Cry is a testament to the strength and resilience of those who fought for equality during the civil rights movement.

Who should read Warriors Don't Cry?

  • Readers who are interested in personal stories of resilience and overcoming adversity
  • Individuals who want to gain a deeper understanding of the Civil Rights Movement and its impact on individuals
  • People who enjoy memoirs and firsthand accounts of historic events

27
Schools Books: The Overachievers by Alexandra Robbins

The Overachievers

Alexandra Robbins
The Secret Lives of Driven Kids

What's The Overachievers about?

The Overachievers delves into the lives of high school students who push themselves to the limit in pursuit of academic and extracurricular success. Through in-depth interviews and research, Alexandra Robbins uncovers the pressures and expectations placed on these students, and explores the impact it has on their mental and emotional well-being. This thought-provoking book sheds light on the culture of achievement in modern education and raises important questions about the cost of relentless ambition.

Who should read The Overachievers?

  • High achievers seeking to understand the pressures and challenges of overachieving
  • Parents, educators, and mentors looking to support and guide ambitious students
  • Individuals interested in the effects of intense achievement culture on mental health and well-being

28
Schools Books: Waterlily by Ella Cara Deloria

Waterlily

Ella Cara Deloria

What's Waterlily about?

Waterlily is a novel that offers a glimpse into the life of a young Dakota woman named Waterlily, set in the 19th century. Written by Ella Cara Deloria, the book explores the traditions, customs, and challenges faced by the Dakota people, while also delving into themes of family, love, and cultural identity. It provides a unique perspective on Native American history and offers a captivating portrayal of a bygone era.

Who should read Waterlily?

  • Readers interested in Native American culture and history
  • Those who enjoy coming-of-age stories
  • Individuals looking for diverse and authentic perspectives in literature

29
Schools Books: They Cage the Animals at Night by Jennings Michael Burch

They Cage the Animals at Night

Jennings Michael Burch
The True Story of an Abandoned Child's Struggle for Emotional Survival

What's They Cage the Animals at Night about?

This memoir tells the heartbreaking story of a young boy who is abandoned by his family and forced to live in various foster homes and institutions. Despite the hardships he faces, he finds solace in his love for animals and his determination to find a place where he truly belongs. It is a powerful and emotional account of resilience and the strength of the human spirit.

Who should read They Cage the Animals at Night?

  • Readers who are interested in personal memoirs
  • People who want to gain insight into the life experiences of children in challenging circumstances
  • Individuals who seek inspiration and resilience in the face of adversity

30
Schools Books: Educating Esme by Esmé Raji Codell

Educating Esme

Esmé Raji Codell
Diary of a Teacher's First Year

What's Educating Esme about?

Educating Esme is a memoir by Esmé Raji Codell that chronicles her experiences as a first-year teacher in a challenging inner-city school. Through a series of journal entries, Codell shares the highs and lows of her teaching journey, offering insights into the education system and the power of connecting with students. It is a heartfelt and inspiring account of one teacher's dedication to making a difference in the lives of her students.

Who should read Educating Esme?

  • Teachers or educators looking for inspiration and fresh ideas to engage their students
  • Parents who want to support their children’s education and understand the challenges in the classroom
  • Anyone interested in the personal journey of a passionate and dedicated teacher

31
Schools Books: The Woman Warrior by Maxine Hong Kingston

The Woman Warrior

Maxine Hong Kingston

What's The Woman Warrior about?

A memoir that blends Chinese folklore, family history, and personal experiences to explore the complexities of being a woman in a traditional Chinese-American family. Through vivid storytelling, the author delves into themes of identity, cultural expectations, and the power of storytelling itself. It offers a unique and thought-provoking perspective on the challenges and triumphs of women in both Chinese and American societies.

Who should read The Woman Warrior?

  • Readers who are interested in exploring the intersection of gender, identity, and culture
  • Individuals who appreciate memoirs and personal narratives that blend fact and fiction
  • Those who enjoy thought-provoking and lyrical writing that challenges traditional storytelling conventions

32
Schools Books: Opening Skinner's Box by Lauren Slater

Opening Skinner's Box

Lauren Slater
Great Psychological Experiments of the Twentieth Century

What's Opening Skinner's Box about?

In "Opening Skinner's Box," Lauren Slater explores the controversial world of psychology through a series of thought-provoking experiments. Drawing on the work of B.F. Skinner and other influential psychologists, Slater delves into the ethical and moral implications of their research, challenging our understanding of human behavior and the nature of free will. This captivating book offers a unique perspective on the field of psychology and its impact on society.

Who should read Opening Skinner's Box?

  • Curious minds looking to explore the complexities of human behavior
  • Psychology enthusiasts seeking a deeper understanding of B.F. Skinner's theories
  • Readers interested in thought-provoking studies on behaviorism and its impact on society

33
Schools Books: Farewell to Manzanar by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston

Farewell to Manzanar

Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston
A True Story of Japanese American Experience During and After the World War II Internment

What's Farewell to Manzanar about?

Farewell to Manzanar is a memoir that recounts the author's experiences as a Japanese-American girl who was interned at the Manzanar War Relocation Center during World War II. It offers a firsthand account of the hardships and injustices faced by Japanese-Americans during this dark chapter in American history. Through poignant storytelling, the book sheds light on the resilience and strength of the human spirit in the face of adversity.

Who should read Farewell to Manzanar?

  • Readers interested in learning about the experiences of Japanese-Americans during World War II
  • Individuals seeking to understand the impact of internment camps on families and communities
  • History enthusiasts wanting to explore themes of identity, resilience, and cultural heritage

34
Schools Books: The Family Crucible by Augustus Y Napier and Carl A Whitaker

The Family Crucible

Augustus Y Napier and Carl A Whitaker

What's The Family Crucible about?

The Family Crucible is a groundbreaking book that delves into the complexities of family dynamics and the ways in which they can shape our lives. Drawing on their extensive experience as family therapists, the authors provide insightful case studies and practical advice for navigating the challenges that arise within families. This thought-provoking book offers a fresh perspective on the power of family relationships and the potential for growth and healing within them.

Who should read The Family Crucible?

  • Individuals seeking to improve their family dynamics and relationships
  • Therapists and counselors looking for insights and techniques for working with families
  • People interested in understanding the impact of family systems on personal development and mental health

35
Schools Books: Discourse on Method by René Descartes

Discourse on Method

René Descartes

What's Discourse on Method about?

In this influential philosophical work, René Descartes presents his method of doubt and reasoning as a means to attain certainty in knowledge. Through a series of meditations, he challenges traditional beliefs and seeks to establish a foundation for truth based on reason and skepticism. The book is a groundbreaking exploration of epistemology and the pursuit of truth.

Who should read Discourse on Method?

  • Curious minds seeking a logical and rational approach to understanding the world
  • Philosophy enthusiasts interested in the foundations of modern thought
  • Those looking to challenge and refine their own thinking processes

36
Schools Books: Death Be Not Proud by John Gunther

Death Be Not Proud

John Gunther

What's Death Be Not Proud about?

This memoir tells the story of John Gunther's son, Johnny, who battles a brain tumor. Through heartbreaking and inspiring moments, Gunther explores the fragility of life and the resilience of the human spirit in the face of death. It is a poignant reflection on the power of love and the acceptance of mortality.

Who should read Death Be Not Proud?

  • People who are interested in personal stories about facing illness and mortality
  • Those who want to gain insights into the human spirit and resilience in the face of adversity
  • Readers who enjoy memoirs and narratives that explore deep emotions and philosophical questions

37
Schools Books: Coming of Age in Mississippi by Anne Moody

Coming of Age in Mississippi

Anne Moody
The Classic Autobiography of a Young Black Girl in the Rural South

What's Coming of Age in Mississippi about?

This memoir by Anne Moody chronicles her experiences growing up as an African American in rural Mississippi during the 1940s and 1950s. It provides a firsthand account of the harsh realities of racism and segregation, as well as the author's journey towards self-discovery and activism. Through her compelling storytelling, Moody sheds light on the struggles and triumphs of the civil rights movement.

Who should read Coming of Age in Mississippi?

  • Readers who are interested in the civil rights movement and its impact on individuals
  • Those who want to gain a deeper understanding of racial inequality and social justice issues
  • People who enjoy memoirs and personal narratives that offer a unique perspective on historical events

38
Schools Books: Enrique's Journey by Sonia Nazario

Enrique's Journey

Sonia Nazario

What's Enrique's Journey about?

This non-fiction book follows the true story of a Honduran boy named Enrique, who embarks on a dangerous and arduous journey to reunite with his mother in the United States. Through vivid storytelling and in-depth research, the author sheds light on the harsh realities faced by undocumented immigrants and the complex issues surrounding immigration. It is a compelling and eye-opening account of one boy's quest for a better life.

Who should read Enrique's Journey?

  • Readers who are curious about the experiences of immigrants and the challenges they face
  • Individuals interested in stories of resilience and determination
  • People looking for a thought-provoking narrative that raises awareness about immigration issues

What's A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies about?

This book provides a firsthand account of the brutal treatment of indigenous peoples in the Americas by Spanish colonizers. Written by a Spanish priest and historian, Bartolomé de las Casas, it exposes the atrocities committed in the name of conquest and colonization, and advocates for the rights and fair treatment of the native populations. A powerful and important historical document.

Who should read A Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies?

  • Readers interested in learning about the impact of European colonization on indigenous populations
  • History enthusiasts who want to understand the atrocities committed during the colonization of the Americas
  • Scholars and students of colonial history or Latin American studies

What's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest about?

The novel follows the story of a rebellious patient named Randle McMurphy who is transferred to a mental institution. Through his interactions with the other patients and the authoritarian Nurse Ratched, the book explores themes of power, freedom, and the definition of sanity. It is a thought-provoking and powerful critique of the mental health system and societal norms.

Who should read One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest?

  • Readers looking for a gripping, thought-provoking story
  • People interested in exploring the themes of mental health and the power of rebellion
  • Those curious about the history and culture of psychiatric institutions

41
Schools Books: Born in Blood and Fire by John Charles Chasteen

Born in Blood and Fire

John Charles Chasteen
A Concise History of Latin America

What's Born in Blood and Fire about?

This book provides a comprehensive history of Latin America, from its pre-Columbian civilizations to the present day. It explores the region's complex and often violent past, examining the impact of colonization, slavery, and independence movements. Chasteen also delves into the social, political, and economic forces that have shaped Latin America, offering a compelling account of its ongoing struggles and triumphs.

Who should read Born in Blood and Fire?

  • History enthusiasts who want to learn about the colonial history of Latin America
  • Students studying Latin American history or politics
  • Travelers planning to visit Latin America and want to understand its historical context

42
Schools Books: Hunger of Memory by Richard Rodriguez

Hunger of Memory

Richard Rodriguez

What's Hunger of Memory about?

This memoir by Richard Rodriguez explores the author's experiences growing up as a Mexican-American in California and his journey to assimilate into American culture. It delves into themes of identity, education, and the complexities of cultural and linguistic assimilation. Through his personal story, Rodriguez offers a thought-provoking reflection on the challenges and rewards of navigating between different cultural worlds.

Who should read Hunger of Memory?

  • Readers interested in exploring the complex relationship between education and identity
  • Individuals seeking insights into the immigrant experience in America
  • Those who want to delve into the effects of assimilation on personal and cultural identity

43
Schools Books: Bless Me, Ultima by Rudolfo Anaya

Bless Me, Ultima

Rudolfo Anaya

What's Bless Me, Ultima about?

Set in rural New Mexico during World War II, "Bless Me, Ultima" tells the coming-of-age story of a young boy named Antonio. When Ultima, a curandera (healer) comes to live with his family, she teaches Antonio about the spiritual and natural world, challenging his beliefs and shaping his understanding of good and evil. The novel explores themes of identity, religion, and the clash between tradition and modernity.

Who should read Bless Me, Ultima?

  • Readers interested in coming-of-age stories set in a culturally rich context
  • Individuals fascinated by the exploration of identity, religion, and spirituality
  • Those looking for a thought-provoking and beautifully written work of literature

44
Schools Books: Chasing Lincoln's Killer by James L. Swanson

Chasing Lincoln's Killer

James L. Swanson

What's Chasing Lincoln's Killer about?

This non-fiction book tells the gripping story of the 12-day manhunt for John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln. Through meticulous research and vivid storytelling, Swanson brings to life the events surrounding Lincoln's assassination and the pursuit of his killer. It offers a fascinating and detailed account of a pivotal moment in American history.

Who should read Chasing Lincoln's Killer?

  • History buffs who enjoy learning about the assassination of Abraham Lincoln
  • Readers interested in American Civil War history and its impact on the nation
  • True crime enthusiasts who enjoy reading about historical events and investigations

45
Schools Books: Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton

Ethan Frome

Edith Wharton

What's Ethan Frome about?

Set in the fictional town of Starkfield, Massachusetts, "Ethan Frome" tells the tragic story of a man trapped in a loveless marriage and his forbidden love for his wife's cousin. Edith Wharton's novel explores themes of duty, sacrifice, and the consequences of unfulfilled desires. With its haunting and atmospheric prose, "Ethan Frome" is a timeless classic that delves into the complexities of human relationships and the harsh realities of rural life in the late 19th century.

Who should read Ethan Frome?

  • Readers who enjoy classic literature
  • Those interested in exploring themes of love, sacrifice, and tragedy
  • People who appreciate beautifully written and introspective narratives

46
Schools Books: Hedda Gabler by Henrik Ibsen

Hedda Gabler

Henrik Ibsen

What's Hedda Gabler about?

Hedda Gabler is a play written by Henrik Ibsen that delves into the complex and tragic life of the title character, Hedda Gabler. Set in 19th century Norway, the play explores themes of power, control, and societal expectations as Hedda navigates her unhappy marriage and the constraints placed upon her as a woman. With its gripping plot and thought-provoking dialogue, Hedda Gabler is a timeless classic that continues to captivate audiences.

Who should read Hedda Gabler?

  • Individuals intrigued by complex and morally ambiguous characters
  • Readers interested in psychological dramas set in 19th-century society
  • Those who appreciate exploring themes of marriage, identity, and societal expectations

47
Schools Books: Billy Budd by Herman Melville

Billy Budd

Herman Melville

What's Billy Budd about?

Billy Budd is a classic novel by Herman Melville that tells the story of a young sailor who is falsely accused of mutiny and sentenced to death. Set aboard a British naval ship during the Napoleonic Wars, the novel explores themes of innocence, justice, and the corrupting influence of power. It is a gripping tale that raises thought-provoking questions about morality and the nature of good and evil.

Who should read Billy Budd?

  • Readers interested in exploring themes of morality and justice
  • People who enjoy literary works with complex character development
  • Those looking for a thought-provoking and impactful read

What's Cry, the Beloved Country about?

Set in South Africa during the 1940s, "Cry, the Beloved Country" tells the story of a Zulu pastor who travels to Johannesburg in search of his son. Through the pastor's journey, the novel explores the racial and social injustices of the time, and the impact of these injustices on individuals and communities. It is a powerful and thought-provoking book that delves into themes of love, loss, and the struggle for justice.

Who should read Cry, the Beloved Country?

  • Readers interested in exploring the consequences of social injustice and racial inequality
  • Individuals seeking a thought-provoking and emotionally impactful novel
  • Those who enjoy character-driven stories that delve into the complexities of human nature

49
Schools Books: A Good Man Is Hard to Find by Flannery O'Connor

A Good Man Is Hard to Find

Flannery O'Connor

What's A Good Man Is Hard to Find about?

A Good Man Is Hard to Find is a collection of short stories by Flannery O'Connor that explores themes of morality, redemption, and the complexities of human nature. The title story follows a family on a road trip that takes a dark turn when they encounter a dangerous criminal, leading to a thought-provoking examination of good and evil. O'Connor's masterful storytelling and vivid characters make this book a compelling and unforgettable read.

Who should read A Good Man Is Hard to Find?

  • Readers who enjoy thought-provoking short stories that explore the complexities of human nature.
  • People who appreciate dark humor and enjoy reading literature that challenges traditional storytelling conventions.
  • Those interested in exploring themes of morality, religion, and the consequences of our actions.

What's Lazarillo de Tormes about?

"Lazarillo de Tormes" is a classic Spanish picaresque novel, believed to have been written in the 16th century. It tells the story of a young boy named Lazarillo who becomes a servant to various masters, each of whom mistreats him in different ways. Through his cunning and resourcefulness, Lazarillo navigates the harsh realities of his time and offers a satirical critique of the social and religious institutions of the era. The novel is considered a significant work in Spanish literature and a precursor to the modern novel.

Who should read Lazarillo de Tormes?

  • Curious readers interested in the history of Spanish literature
  • Those who enjoy satirical and humorous storytelling
  • People who want to explore the themes of poverty and social inequality

51
Schools Books: Oroonoko by Aphra Behn

Oroonoko

Aphra Behn

What's Oroonoko about?

Oroonoko is a novel written by Aphra Behn that tells the tragic story of an African prince who is captured and sold into slavery in the English colony of Surinam. The book explores themes of race, colonialism, and the struggle for freedom, and is considered one of the earliest English novels to address these issues. It is a powerful and thought-provoking work that challenges the reader to confront the injustices of the time.

Who should read Oroonoko?

  • Readers interested in exploring themes of identity, power, and colonialism
  • Students of literature or history studying 17th-century literature or early colonialism
  • Fans of historical fiction who enjoy immersive and character-driven narratives

52
Schools Books: Dreaming in Cuban by Cristina García

Dreaming in Cuban

Cristina García

What's Dreaming in Cuban about?

Dreaming in Cuban is a novel that follows three generations of a Cuban family, exploring their experiences and relationships as they navigate the political and social changes in their country. Through vivid storytelling and magical realism, the book delves into themes of identity, love, and the impact of history on individual lives. It offers a unique perspective on Cuban culture and history, while also delving into the complexities of family dynamics.

Who should read Dreaming in Cuban?

  • Readers interested in exploring themes of cultural identity and family dynamics
  • Individuals who enjoy multi-generational narratives with rich historical background
  • Those who appreciate lyrical prose and vivid descriptions

53
Schools Books: A Hope in the Unseen by Ron Suskind

A Hope in the Unseen

Ron Suskind
An American Odyssey from the Inner City to the Ivy League

What's A Hope in the Unseen about?

A Hope in the Unseen tells the inspiring true story of Cedric Jennings, a young African American from a rough neighborhood in Washington, D.C. who defies the odds to attend an Ivy League university. Facing poverty, violence, and discrimination, Cedric's determination and resilience shine through as he pursues his dreams of a better future. This powerful book offers a glimpse into the challenges and triumphs of inner-city education and the potential for change.

Who should read A Hope in the Unseen?

  • Readers interested in real-life stories of perseverance and overcoming obstacles
  • People curious about the challenges faced by underprivileged students and the education system
  • Individuals looking for inspiration and motivation in their own personal journeys

54
Schools Books: Tartuffe by Molière

Tartuffe

Molière

What's Tartuffe about?

"Tartuffe" is a classic French play written by Molière. It tells the story of a wealthy man named Orgon who is deceived by the hypocritical and manipulative Tartuffe. The play explores themes of religious hypocrisy, gullibility, and the consequences of blind faith. It is a satirical and thought-provoking work that continues to be relevant today.

Who should read Tartuffe?

  • Readers who enjoy satirical and comedic literature
  • People interested in exploring themes of hypocrisy and deception in society
  • Those who want to delve into classic French plays and the works of Molière

55
Schools Books: My Antonia by Willa Cather

My Antonia

Willa Cather

What's My Antonia about?

My Antonia is a novel that tells the story of a young immigrant girl named Antonia Shimerda and her journey to America. Set in the vast plains of Nebraska, the book explores themes of friendship, hardship, and the immigrant experience, offering a poignant portrayal of life on the American frontier in the late 19th century. Through beautiful prose and vivid descriptions, Willa Cather captures the essence of the American landscape and celebrates the resilience of the human spirit.

Who should read My Antonia?

  • Readers who are interested in exploring the immigrant experience in early 20th century America
  • People who appreciate richly descriptive and atmospheric writing
  • Those who enjoy character-driven stories with a strong sense of place and nostalgia

56
Schools Books: A Separate Peace by John Knowles

A Separate Peace

John Knowles

What's A Separate Peace about?

Set during World War II, "A Separate Peace" tells the story of two friends at a boarding school and the jealousy and betrayal that ultimately leads to a tragic event. It explores themes of friendship, rivalry, and the loss of innocence. The novel delves into the complexities of human relationships and the impact of war on young minds.

Who should read A Separate Peace?

  • Readers interested in coming-of-age stories
  • Those who enjoy exploring themes of friendship, jealousy, and betrayal
  • People looking for a thought-provoking and introspective reading experience

57
Schools Books: The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams

The Glass Menagerie

Tennessee Williams

What's The Glass Menagerie about?

The Glass Menagerie is a classic play that delves into the lives of the Wingfield family. Set in 1930s St. Louis, the story revolves around the dreams and struggles of the family members, particularly the fragile Laura and her overbearing mother Amanda. Through poetic language and poignant storytelling, Tennessee Williams explores themes of illusion, escape, and the harsh realities of life.

Who should read The Glass Menagerie?

  • Individuals interested in exploring complex family dynamics and relationships
  • Readers who appreciate introspective and introspective narratives
  • Those who enjoy reading plays that reflect on the human condition

58
Schools Books: Life Is a Dream by Pedro Calderón de la Barca

Life Is a Dream

Pedro Calderón de la Barca

What's Life Is a Dream about?

"Life Is a Dream" is a thought-provoking play that explores the themes of fate, free will, and the nature of reality. Written by Spanish playwright Pedro Calderón de la Barca, the story follows the journey of Prince Segismundo, who is imprisoned at birth due to a prophecy. As he grapples with his newfound freedom, Segismundo questions the nature of his existence and the power of his own choices. This philosophical and introspective work challenges the audience to ponder the meaning of life and the role of destiny in shaping our experiences.

Who should read Life Is a Dream?

  • Readers who enjoy exploring philosophical themes and thought-provoking ideas
  • Individuals interested in Spanish literature and classic plays
  • Those who appreciate stories that challenge perceptions of reality and the nature of existence

59
Schools Books: Chronicle of a Death Foretold by Gabriel García Márquez, Gregory Rabassa

Chronicle of a Death Foretold

Gabriel García Márquez, Gregory Rabassa

What's Chronicle of a Death Foretold about?

Chronicle of a Death Foretold by Gabriel García Márquez is a gripping and thought-provoking novel that delves into the complexities of honor and fate. Set in a small Colombian town, it tells the story of a young man's predestined death and the chain of events that lead up to it. With lyrical prose and a nonlinear narrative, the book explores themes of guilt, justice, and the blurred lines between truth and perception.

Who should read Chronicle of a Death Foretold?

  • Readers who enjoy mystery and suspense
  • Those interested in exploring themes of honor and justice
  • People who appreciate lyrical and evocative writing

60
Schools Books: The Color of Water by James McBride, Lainie Kazan

The Color of Water

James McBride, Lainie Kazan

What's The Color of Water about?

The Color of Water by James McBride is a memoir that tells the story of the author's mother, a white Jewish woman who married a black man in 1942. The book explores themes of race, identity, and family as it delves into the complexities of their lives and the challenges they faced. It is a powerful and moving account of one woman's journey and the impact it had on her children.

Who should read The Color of Water?

  • Readers who enjoy memoirs and personal stories
  • Those interested in themes of identity, race, and family
  • Individuals who appreciate honest and heartfelt storytelling

61
Schools Books: Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys, Judith L. Raiskin

Wide Sargasso Sea

Jean Rhys, Judith L. Raiskin

What's Wide Sargasso Sea about?

Wide Sargasso Sea is a novel by Jean Rhys that serves as a prequel to Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre. Set in Jamaica, it tells the story of Antoinette Cosway, a Creole woman who becomes the first wife of Mr. Rochester. The book explores themes of colonialism, racial inequality, and the oppression of women.

Who should read Wide Sargasso Sea?

  • Individuals interested in reimagined literary classics
  • Readers who appreciate complex and psychologically rich characters
  • Those who enjoy exploring themes of race, identity, and power in colonial settings

Related Topics

Schools Books
 FAQs 

What's the best Schools book to read?

While choosing just one book about a topic is always tough, many people regard Learn or Die as the ultimate read on Schools.

What are the Top 10 Schools books?

Blinkist curators have picked the following:
  • Learn or Die by Edward D. Hess
  • A Bigger Prize by Margaret Heffernan
  • Creative Schools by Ken Robinson and Lou Aronica
  • The Importance of Being Little by Erika Christakis
  • Why Don’t Students Like School? by Daniel T. Willingham
  • Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government by Robert T. Kiyosaki
  • Better Together by Lydia Dobyns and Tom Vander Ark
  • The Case Against Education by Bryan Caplan
  • Grasp by Sanjay Sarma, Luke Yoquinto
  • Thrivers by Michele Borba

Who are the top Schools book authors?

When it comes to Schools, these are the authors who stand out as some of the most influential:
  • Edward D. Hess
  • Margaret Heffernan
  • Ken Robinson and Lou Aronica
  • Erika Christakis
  • Daniel T. Willingham