Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government Book Summary - Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government Book explained in key points
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Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government summary

Robert T. Kiyosaki

Rich Dad's Guide to Financial Education for Parents

4.3 (405 ratings)
18 mins

Brief summary

Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government by Robert T. Kiyosaki is a book that challenges the notion that academic success guarantees professional success, and provides insights on how to achieve financial freedom and success.

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    Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government
    Summary of 6 key ideas

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    A solid financial education adapts itself to meet the needs and experiences of the student.

    What’s the perfect time to teach a child about finance?

    There’s no hard-and-fast rule. But a good rule of thumb is when a child is able to tell the difference between a one dollar bill and a five dollar bill. When they can do this, they’re ready to begin their financial education. 

    This education won’t be a process that takes a matter of weeks or months. Financial education takes years, encompassing three distinct windows of learning, each with their own specific needs. 

    The key message here is: A solid financial education adapts itself to meet the needs and experiences of the student.

    A child’s first window of learning, Quantum Learning, takes place from birth until about age twelve. During this time, children are essentially learning machines. They learn without effort. Every new experience teaches them something new about life and the world around them. 

    Around the age of four, the brain begins to divide into distinct hemispheres: the left – thought to be the more analytical half – and the right, which is the creative, artistic side. Most children will end up favoring either the left or the right hemisphere. Parents can take advantage of this change by educating their children on finance through games like Monopoly. Games engage both the left and right hemispheres, so no matter what side your child favors, their learning centers will be stimulated and engaged.

    Once a child turns twelve, it becomes harder to learn fundamental skills like languages. At this age, the process transforms into a stage of Rebellious Learning. The child wants to make their own decisions and learn what they want to learn. Unfortunately, they aren’t always aware of the consequences of their decisions, and this can get them into trouble.

    It’s a critical time that can test any parent-child relationship, but you can still educate them effectively. One tip is to make them aware of potential consequences by openly discussing your own financial concerns when they occur.

    The third window of learning, Professional Learning, takes place in young adulthood when they’re getting their first taste of the real world. They’ll build on the lessons they learned from childhood and apply them to their own lives. This is the time when we find out whether or not we’ve chosen the right career path. If it isn’t a good fit, now is an excellent time to change direction.

    But what is the right career? How can you help your offspring pick the right path? Find out in the next blink.

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    What is Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government about?

    Why “A” Students Work For “C” Students And “B” Students Work For The Government (2013) explains how the global financial crisis we face today is really a crisis of education. Schools are failing to provide students with even the most fundamental financial education. It’s up to parents to teach their children about real-world financial responsibility. 

    Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government Review

    Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government (2013) by Robert T. Kiyosaki presents unconventional wisdom about why academic success doesn't always lead to financial success. Here's why this book is worth reading:

    • It challenges conventional notions of success, providing a fresh perspective and encouraging readers to question traditional paths to achievement.
    • The book offers practical strategies for financial independence and wealth creation, empowering readers to take control of their financial futures.
    • With its engaging stories and relatable anecdotes, the book never fails to capture the reader's interest, delivering valuable insights in an enjoyable manner.

    Who should read Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government?

    • Parents who want to give their children the basis for a sound financial education
    • Anyone who has wondered why schools don’t teach students about money
    • Fans of Rich Dad Poor Dad

    About the Author

    Robert T. Kiyosaki is an entrepreneur, educator, and the author of Rich Dad Poor Dad – the #1 best-selling Personal Finance book of all time. He has written more than two dozen books, including Why We Want You To Be Rich, co-written with Donald J. Trump.

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    Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government FAQs 

    What is the main message of Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government?

    Discover why academic success doesn't always guarantee financial success.

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    Is Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government a good book? Is it worth reading?

    Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government is worth reading. It offers valuable insights into the connection between education and financial success.

    Who is the author of Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government?

    The author of Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government is Robert T. Kiyosaki.

    What to read after Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government?

    If you're wondering what to read next after Why “A” Students Work for “C” Students and “B” Students Work for the Government, here are some recommendations we suggest:
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    • Second Chance by Robert T. Kiyosaki
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    • Rich Dad's Who Took My Money? by Robert T. Kiyosaki
    • Buffett by Roger Lowenstein
    • The Last Safe Investment by Michael Ellsberg and Bryan Franklin
    • Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill
    • Secrets of the Millionaire Mind by T. Harv Eker
    • Rich Dad’s Cashflow Quadrant by Robert T. Kiyosaki with Sharon L. Lechter
    • Get Smart! by Brian Tracy