Kategorien entdecken

Das sind die Blinks zu

Through the Language Glass

Why the World Looks Different in Other Languages

Von Guy Deutscher
16 Minuten
Audio-Version verfügbar
Through the Language Glass: Why the World Looks Different in Other Languages von Guy Deutscher

Through the Language Glass (2010) explores the many ways in which language both reflects and influences our culture. By exploring the different ways that languages deal with space, gender and color, the book demonstrates just how fundamentally the language you speak alters your perception of the world.

This is a Blinkist staff pick

“These blinks take you through history and around the world in search of answers to the age-old question of how the languages we speak affect the way we think and act. Really fascinating stuff!”

– Erik, Editorial Production Manager at Blinkist

  • People interested in language and how it affects us
  • Anyone interested in how the brain works
  • Linguistics students

Guy Deutscher is a linguist and Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Manchester. In addition to his numerous academic contributions, Deutscher is also the author of The Unfolding of Language.

Kennst du schon Blinkist Premium?

Mit Blinkist Premium erhältst du Zugang zu dem Wichtigsten aus mehr als 3.000 Sachbuch-Bestsellern. Das Probeabo ist 100% kostenlos.

Premium kostenlos testen

Was ist Blinkist?

Blinkist ist eine App, die die großen Ideen der besten Sachbücher in einprägsame Kurztexte verpackt und erklärt. Die Inhalte der über 3.000 Titel starken Bibliothek reichen von Sachbuch-Klassikern, über populäre Ratgeber bis hin zu diskutierten Neuerscheinungen. Basierend auf wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnissen wird jeder Titel von speziell geschulten Autoren aufbereitet und dem Nutzer als Kurztext und Audiotitel zur Verfügung gestellt.

Discover
3.000+ top
nonfiction titles

Get unlimited access to the most important ideas in business, investing, marketing, psychology, politics, and more. Stay ahead of the curve with recommended reading lists curated by experts.

Entdecke die Kernaussagen zu diesem Titel:
Entdecke die Kernaussagen zu diesem Titel:
Entdecke die Kernaussagen zu diesem Titel:

Through the Language Glass

Why the World Looks Different in Other Languages

Von Guy Deutscher
  • Lesedauer: 16 Minuten
  • Verfügbar in Text & Audio
  • 10 Kernaussagen
Jetzt kostenloses Probeabo starten Jetzt lesen oder anhören
Through the Language Glass: Why the World Looks Different in Other Languages von Guy Deutscher
Worum geht's

Through the Language Glass (2010) explores the many ways in which language both reflects and influences our culture. By exploring the different ways that languages deal with space, gender and color, the book demonstrates just how fundamentally the language you speak alters your perception of the world.

This is a Blinkist staff pick

“These blinks take you through history and around the world in search of answers to the age-old question of how the languages we speak affect the way we think and act. Really fascinating stuff!”

– Erik, Editorial Production Manager at Blinkist

Kernaussage 1 von 10

Language reflects culture.

If you’ve ever read the works of the Ancient Greek poet Homer, you might have noticed that he never employs a word that could be taken to mean “blue.” Why? Because color is one area where language reflects culture. The Ancient Greeks, as you’ll soon discover, had a very different culture of color than we do today.

Based on the words for color used in The Iliad and The Odyssey, the English prime minister and scholar William Ewart Gladstone argued that the ancient Greeks’ sense of color must have differed from ours.

In his Studies on Homer and the Homeric Age, published in 1858, Gladstone argued that the Greeks perceived the world in something closer to black-and-white than technicolor.

According to Gladstone, Homer wasn’t merely exercising poetic license when he chose his words – words that seem strange by today’s standards. Rather, like the rest of the Ancient Greeks, he had an undeveloped perception of color, largely confined to light and dark. This is why he described things like honey and freshly-picked twigs as chlôros (green), a color neither black nor white, to give a sense of their paleness and freshness.

Further adding to Gladstone’s case was the fact that Homer made little or no reference to color when we might otherwise expect it, such as when speaking of spring flowers in a field. Moreover, he generally preferred elementary forms of color – black and white – over others. For example, melas (black) can be found 170 times in his works, whereas xanthos (yellow) appears only ten times.

This led Gladstone to claim that, at some point, mankind underwent an education of the eye – that is, we learned to perceive differences in color – that hadn’t yet happened in Ancient Greece. But why?

In Ancient Greece, artificial colors, produced through paints and dyes, were still in their infancy. For instance, Ancient Greeks rarely saw blue (apart from the sea and sky), as blue eyes, blue dyes and truly blue flowers were rare. Perhaps this is why Homer never uses a word for “blue.”

Mit Premium freischalten Jetzt lesen oder anhören

Inhalt

Mit Premium freischalten Jetzt lesen oder anhören

Bringe mehr Wissen in deinen Alltag!

Sichere dir jetzt Zugang zu den Kernaussagen der besten Sachbücher – praktisch in Text & Audio in nur 15 Minuten pro Titel.
Created with Sketch.