The best 41 Life Sciences books

1
You Can Fix Your Brain

You Can Fix Your Brain

Dr. Tom O'Bryan
Just 1 Hour a Week to the Best Memory, Productivity, and Sleep You've Ever Had
3.8 (48 ratings)

What's You Can Fix Your Brain about?

You Can Fix Your Brain (2018) is a step-by-step guide to improving cognitive function and overall brain health. Through dietary choices, environmental adjustments, and other health practices, you can reduce brain fog, enhance your memory, and increase your mental clarity.

Who should read You Can Fix Your Brain?

  • People who are experiencing brain fog or are having trouble concentrating
  • Those who wish to reduce their risk of Alzheimer’s and dementia
  • Anyone who wants to feel sharper and improve their mental function

2
Guns, Germs and Steel

Guns, Germs and Steel

Jared Diamond
The Fates Of Human Societies
4.2 (332 ratings)

What's Guns, Germs and Steel about?

Guns, Germs, and Steel (1997) is a short history of humanity over the last 13,000 years. The question it poses is as simple to state as it is hard to answer: Why did some parts of the world develop advanced technologies while others didn’t? It rejects explanations that rely on assumptions about the relative intelligence of different peoples. Instead, it argues that the divergence of human societies is best explained by natural factors such as climate, biology, and geology. 

Who should read Guns, Germs and Steel?

  • History buffs
  • Scientists
  • Anyone interested in the big picture of humanity’s development

3
Lifespan

Lifespan

David A. Sinclair and Matthew D. LaPlante
Why We Age – and Why We Don’t Have To
4.5 (475 ratings)

What's Lifespan about?

Lifespan (2019) delves into cutting-edge genetic research and advances new theories on why we age and how we can prevent aging altogether. From high-tech lab research to simple nutritional strategies, it serves as a guide to the varied ways in which we can already, or might soon be able to live longer and better lives.

Who should read Lifespan ?

  • Young people who want to age better
  • Older people who want to feel young again
  • Anyone who wants to live a longer, healthier life

4
The Evolution of Desire

The Evolution of Desire

David M. Buss
Strategies of Human Mating
3.4 (34 ratings)

What's The Evolution of Desire about?

The Evolution of Desire (1994) drew on the largest study of human mating at the time to analyze the evolutionary foundations that lie behind our everyday desires and mating preferences. It was updated with new material in 2016.

Who should read The Evolution of Desire?

  • Psychology nerds
  • Individuals looking to attract a mate
  • Anyone curious about how our deepest desires work

5
The Selfish Gene

The Selfish Gene

Richard Dawkins
A landmark work in the field of biology and evolution
4.5 (298 ratings)

What's The Selfish Gene about?

The Selfish Gene is a landmark 1976 work in the field of biology: It puts the gene at the center of the process of evolution and explains how, when this is taken into account, genes must be seen as “selfish.” Author Richard Dawkins then uses this theory of gene selfishness to explain the massive variety of animal behavior observable on Earth.

Who should read The Selfish Gene?

  • ‘Everyone interested in the universe and their place in it.’
  • Any student of biology or anyone with an interest in biology

6
The Moral Animal

The Moral Animal

Robert Wright
Why We Are the Way We Are: The New Science of Evolutionary Psychology
4.4 (159 ratings)

What's The Moral Animal about?

The Moral Animal (1994) delves into the fascinating – and occasionally controversial – field of evolutionary psychology to ask what really motivates human behavior. Drawing on the work of Darwin as well as a wealth of anthropological sources, Robert Wright sheds new light on a range of familiar everyday situations in the animal kingdom and our own societies.

Who should read The Moral Animal?

  • Psychologists and keen observers of human behavior
  • Biologists and other natural scientists
  • Anyone fascinated by the evolution of our species

7
The Book of Humans

The Book of Humans

Adam Rutherford
A Brief History of Culture, Sex, War and the Evolution of Us
4.3 (192 ratings)

What's The Book of Humans about?

The Book of Humans (2018) is an accessible tour of evolutionary history. It illuminates both the many qualities we share with animals and the many others that set us apart. Incorporating the latest scientific discoveries from genetics and archaeology, it provides a thrilling compendium of the rich variety of life on Earth.

Who should read The Book of Humans?

  • People seeking a primer on evolutionary biology
  • Darwin enthusiasts
  • Animal lovers

8
Energy

Energy

Vaclav Smil
A Beginner’s Guide
3.6 (115 ratings)

What's Energy about?

Energy (2006) offers insights into one of the most elusive concepts in the spectrum of human thought: energy. By understanding what energy is, how it has helped us get where we are today, and what dangers our reliance on certain forms of energy poses, we will be better equipped to handle the challenges faced by modern civilization.

Who should read Energy?

  • Readers looking for the ultimate explanation of how our world works
  • Physics fans and climate change deniers
  • Anyone who is awed by the miracle of life

9
Grand Transitions

Grand Transitions

Vaclav Smil
How the Modern World Was Made
4.3 (225 ratings)

What's Grand Transitions about?

Grand Transitions (2020) offers a sweeping overview of global transitions, from population growth to environmental changes. It examines the ways that we’ve shaped the world, for better or worse, and looks at the challenges facing humanity in the decades to come.

Who should read Grand Transitions?

  • People who want to understand world history, and how we got where we are today
  • Environmentalists, and anyone interested in the state of the planet
  • Realists looking for a future forecast based on facts

10
The Gene

The Gene

Siddhartha Mukherjee
An Intimate History
4.5 (143 ratings)

What's The Gene about?

The Gene (2016) offers an in-depth look at the history of genetics. These blinks take you on a journey from the field’s humble beginnings to its modern day applications in diagnosing illnesses, debunking racist claims and creating genetically modified life. 

Who should read The Gene?

  • People interested in how genetic traits are passed on 
  • Students studying medicine or biology 
  • Anyone curious about the history of genetic research

11
Inheritance

Inheritance

Sharon Moalem
How Our Genes Change Our Lives, and Our Lives Change Our Genes
4.2 (43 ratings)

What's Inheritance about?

Inheritance (2014) is proof that you don’t need to be a scientist to understand the importance of your genetics. These blinks explain how your DNA affects your everyday life, from how you look and what you eat to how susceptible you are to things like anxiety and disease. So arm yourself with knowledge, and discover more about the genes that make you who you are.

Who should read Inheritance?

  • People interested in medicine and biology
  • Readers worried about what genes they inherited
  • Anyone in search of the perfect diet

12
The Science and Technology of Growing Young

The Science and Technology of Growing Young

Sergey Young
An Insider's Guide to the Breakthroughs That Will Dramatically Extend Our Lifespan . . . and What You Can Do Right Now
4.4 (352 ratings)

What's The Science and Technology of Growing Young about?

The Science and Technology of Growing Young (2021) reveals that the Longevity Revolution is just around the corner. Thanks to developments in AI, quantum computing, and genome sequencing, we’re able to engage in genetic engineering, manufacture new body parts, and treat diseases before they’ve even begun to affect us. These developments will soon allow us to live longer and healthier lives than we ever thought possible.

Who should read The Science and Technology of Growing Young?

  • Tech geeks curious about how AI has impacted health care
  • Middle-aged people wanting to reverse the effects of aging
  • People who want to find out how to optimize their health to live longer, fuller lives

13
The Epigenetics Revolution

The Epigenetics Revolution

Nessa Carey
How Modern Biology is Rewriting Our Understanding of Genetics, Disease, and Inheritance
4.6 (310 ratings)

What's The Epigenetics Revolution about?

The Epigenetics Revolution (2011) is an overview of the cutting-edge field of epigenetics – looking at the various factors that interact with your genes and modify the way they behave in order to make you, you. From mental health to obesity, it examines the fascinating and often unexpected ways that epigenetics can influence our lives and health.

Who should read The Epigenetics Revolution?

  • Science enthusiasts interested in biology’s new frontiers
  • Dinner-party sages looking to wow friends with fascinating scientific wisdom
  • Amateur psychologists open to an epigenetic interpretation of trauma

14
America Before

America Before

Graham Hancock
The Key to Earth’s Lost Civilization
4.1 (104 ratings)

What's America Before about?

America Before (2019) is a mind-expanding quest for an ancient and lost way of life. Drawing on lesser-known DNA and archeological evidence, it proposes the existence of a great, early civilization based in North America. Lost to history in the aftermath of a cataclysmic comet strike, this civilization is visible today only in the traces it left in Egyptian, Native American and other great ancient cultures.

Who should read America Before?

  • Anyone looking for an imaginative adventure into the past
  • Historians and archeologists willing to challenge the established view

15
The Extended Phenotype

The Extended Phenotype

Richard Dawkins
The Long Reach of the Gene
4.6 (58 ratings)

What's The Extended Phenotype about?

The Extended Phenotype (1982) offers an alternative view on biology and the process of evolution. Breaking with the Darwinian paradigm that puts the individual organism center stage, author Richard Dawkins shifts the focus toward genes as the active agents in natural selection. From this perspective, a world of fascinating insights emerges.

Who should read The Extended Phenotype?

  • Students of biology and genetics
  • Anyone interested in how life on earth evolved
  • Science geeks

16
Genome

Genome

Matt Ridley
The Autobiography of a Species in 23 Chapters
4.3 (57 ratings)

What's Genome about?

Genome (2006, second edition) takes you on an exciting journey into your own body, exploring the genetic building blocks that make up not only who you are but also all life on earth. You’ll examine the basics of genetics and discover what genes influence, from aging to illness to even your own personality. Importantly, you’ll better understand why the future of healthcare and wellness may be found in the human genome.

Who should read Genome?

  • Students of biology or genetics
  • People curious about biological determinism vs. societal determinism
  • Anyone wondering how exactly genes work

17
Good Reasons for Bad Feelings

Good Reasons for Bad Feelings

Randolph M. Nesse
Insights from the Frontier of Evolutionary Psychiatry
4.2 (112 ratings)

What's Good Reasons for Bad Feelings about?

Good Reasons for Bad Feelings (2018) bridges the gap between evolutionary biology and psychiatry by answering some pressing questions about why we feel the way we do. By focusing on our evolutionary development, we can better understand where many of our most instinctual feelings, moods and emotions come from, and how we can better treat our disorders when they arise.

Who should read Good Reasons for Bad Feelings?

  • Anyone affected by mental disorders
  • People who want to better understand how the mind works
  • Students of psychiatry and medicine

18
Why We Eat (Too Much)

Why We Eat (Too Much)

Andrew Jenkinson
The New Science of Appetite
4.1 (168 ratings)

What's Why We Eat (Too Much) about?

Why We Eat (Too Much) (2021) illuminates the new science of metabolism. An exploration of how our bodies process the calories we eat into the fuel that keeps our cells running, it demolishes old myths about the value of dieting. When we really understand appetite, it argues, we can finally begin eating healthfully rather than attempting to starve our bodies into submission. 

Who should read Why We Eat (Too Much)?

  • Frustrated dieters 
  • Science lovers 
  • Sugar addicts

19
A Crack in Creation

A Crack in Creation

Jennifer A. Doudna and Samuel H. Sternberg
Gene Editing and the Unthinkable Power to Control Evolution
4.7 (59 ratings)

What's A Crack in Creation about?

A Crack in Creation (2017) describes everything you need to know about CRISPR, a new technique to alter the genes of living organisms. These blinks explain the scientific details of gene editing, while also discussing its medical and ethical implications.

Who should read A Crack in Creation?

  • Biologists, chemists and natural scientists
  • Philosophers and ethicists who wonder about the implications of gene editing
  • Anyone interested in the future of medical science

20
Finding the Mother Tree

Finding the Mother Tree

Suzanne Simard
Discovering How the Forest Is Wired for Intelligence and Healing
4.5 (197 ratings)

What's Finding the Mother Tree about?

Finding the Mother Tree (2021) is a vivid blend of science and memoir that describes the breathtaking personal and professional journey of renowned ecologist Suzanne Simard. It unearths the strange and surprising secrets buried deep in the forests of British Columbia –⁠ and, in the process, forever alters our understanding of the natural world. 

Who should read Finding the Mother Tree?

  • Lovers of the natural world
  • Fans of memoir and biography
  • Anyone yearning to escape the city for the wilderness

21
The Dharma in DNA

The Dharma in DNA

Dee Denver
Insights at the Intersection of Biology and Buddhism
4.2 (268 ratings)

What's The Dharma in DNA about?

The Dharma in DNA (2022) explores the intersections between Buddhist philosophy and biology. At first glance, these two traditions couldn’t be more different. One is spiritual; the other empirical. But there are overlaps. Both traditions are attempts to discover meaning, for one. But there’s more to it than that: both the teachings of the Buddha and the findings of biologists appear to converge on a similar understanding of what it means to be human.

Who should read The Dharma in DNA?

  • Open-minded rationalists and skeptics
  • Thinkers who love big ideas
  • Spiritualists interested in science

22
The Extended Mind

The Extended Mind

Annie Murphy Paul
The Power of Thinking Outside the Brain
4.8 (981 ratings)

What's The Extended Mind about?

The Extended Mind (2021) is an exploration of the power of thinking outside the confines of your brain. It shows that the path to greater intelligence is not locked within your skull. Rather, it's a path through your body, your environment and your relationships with others. 

Who should read The Extended Mind?

  • People interested in the interaction of the body, brain and environment
  • Anyone interested in designing better spaces for creativity and teamwork
  • Anyone who’d like to optimize their working and learning relationships

23
Flow

Flow

Elissa Stein and Susan Kim
The Cultural Story of Menstruation
4.4 (18 ratings)

What's Flow about?

Flow (2009) explores the historical and cultural context of menstruation. By doing so, it seeks to debunk the myths that surround periods and address the misperceptions people have of the basic bodily process of menstruation.

Who should read Flow?

  • Those interested in the history and cultural significance of menstruation
  • Women who are afraid to ask their friends and family about periods and sexual health
  • Women experiencing puberty or menopause

24
She/He/They/Me

She/He/They/Me

Robyn Ryle
For the Sisters, Misters, and Binary Resisters
2.8 (256 ratings)

What's She/He/They/Me about?

She/He/They/Me (2019) provides readers with a unique opportunity to explore the many concepts and phenomena of gender. Weaving anthropology, global history and gender studies into a fascinating blend of empirical information and theoretical speculation, author Robyn Ryle opens our eyes to the sheer vastness of the possible forms that gender can take.

Who should read She/He/They/Me?

  • People interested in fighting for a society that has more gender equality 
  • Those seeking a deeper understanding of masculinity and femininity 
  • Individuals interested in doing away with such dualities altogether

25
She Has Her Mother’s Laugh

She Has Her Mother’s Laugh

Carl Zimmer
The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity
4.5 (44 ratings)

What's She Has Her Mother’s Laugh about?

She Has Her Mother’s Laugh (2018) probes the contemporary understanding of genetics and heredity, and provides an accessible history of the subject from the time of the Ancient Greeks onwards. Author Carl Zimmer also looks to the future, forecasting genetic developments on the horizon and unpacking what they might mean for humanity.

Who should read She Has Her Mother’s Laugh?

  • Science enthusiasts who want to round out their understanding of genetics and DNA
  • History buffs who enjoy reading about science and medicine
  • Amateur genealogists with an interest in getting to the roots of their family trees

26
What is Life?

What is Life?

Erwin Schrödinger
With Mind and Matter and Autobiographical Sketches
4.4 (280 ratings)

What's What is Life? about?

What is Life? (1944) is a classic scientific text based on a series of lectures given at Trinity College, Dublin, by famous physicist Erwin Schrödinger. Though Schrödinger was a physicist, these lectures addressed issues in biology and genetics –⁠ primarily the fundamental question of how physics and chemistry can account for the processes that occur within living organisms. The concepts he explored went on to spark a revolution in genetics, inspiring, among others, the biologists James D. Watson and Francis Crick, who together proposed the double helix structure of DNA.

Who should read What is Life??

  • Science geeks
  • Big-picture thinkers, ponderers, and questioners
  • Anyone who loves getting to the bottom of how the universe works

27
Extra Life

Extra Life

Steven Johnson
A Short History of Living Longer
4.4 (56 ratings)

What's Extra Life about?

Extra Life (2021) looks at some of the breakthroughs that allowed the global human life expectancy to double in just one hundred years. From seat belts to explosives, from Ireland to Constantinople, it’s an account as gripping as it is wide-ranging.

Who should read Extra Life?

  • History buffs interested in lesser-known tales from times past 
  • Medical nerds fascinated by the history of human health
  • Humanitarians who want to learn from past progress

28
Some Assembly Required

Some Assembly Required

Neil Shubin
Decoding Four Billion Years of Life, from Ancient Fossils to DNA
4.1 (41 ratings)

What's Some Assembly Required about?

Some Assembly Required (2020) is an approachable account of the great transformations in the history of life. Paleontologist Neil Shubin started his career looking to fossils for the answers to life’s greatest questions – but with recent scientific advancements, he argues that studying DNA reveals more about the journey we took to become human.

Who should read Some Assembly Required?

  • People interested in the history of evolution
  • Science enthusiasts
  • Anyone who loves an amazing factoid

29
Our Wild Calling

Our Wild Calling

Richard Louv
How Connecting with Animals Can Transform Our Lives—and Save Theirs
4.5 (43 ratings)

What's Our Wild Calling about?

Our Wild Calling (2020) examines how humans and other animals can enjoy mutually beneficial relationships. It explores stories and philosophy from the ecological movement, and outlines how we can move toward a more hopeful future for all Earthlings. 

Who should read Our Wild Calling?

  • Nature lovers looking for inspiration
  • Office dwellers seeking ways to reconnect with nature
  • Anyone looking for direct ways to respond to global climate change

30
The Emerald Planet

The Emerald Planet

David Beerling
How Plants Changed Earth's History
4.6 (33 ratings)

What's The Emerald Planet about?

The Emerald Planet (2007) looks at the central role plants have played in shaping the planet and its environment. New research makes use of plants, both fossilized and living, to explain how the planet got where it is, and where it might go in the future. The Emerald Planet inspired a three-part BBC series called How to Grow a Planet.

Who should read The Emerald Planet?

  • Anyone interested in plant biology and paleobotany
  • People who want to learn more about ancient mass extinctions
  • Evolutionary science enthusiasts

31
Stem Cells

Stem Cells

Jonathan Slack
A Very Short Introduction
4.4 (215 ratings)

What's Stem Cells about?

Stem Cells (2021) provides an introduction to stem cells – how they’re used by scientists, the therapies that exist today, and what the near future holds. It focuses on the medical and scientific consideration of stem cells and only briefly considers ethical, political, and legal aspects. This “very short introduction” is part of a series of over 650 short introductions covering myriad subjects in every discipline.

Who should read Stem Cells?

  • Biology buffs
  • Stem cell therapy skeptics and miracle-cure seekers
  • Politicians and businesspeople interested in the future of stem cell applications

32
Hacking Darwin

Hacking Darwin

Jamie Metzl
Genetic Engineering and the Future of Humanity
4.4 (94 ratings)

What's Hacking Darwin about?

Hacking Darwin (2019) argues that humanity is on the cusp of a future beyond natural selection with the help of assisted reproductive technologies that will enable us to hack our genetic makeup. By mapping the history of genetics, technology and the implications of genetic engineering, it advocates for an informed adoption of the genetic revolution and suggests how to approach its political and ethical challenges.

Who should read Hacking Darwin?

  • Prospective parents interested in advanced reproductive technologies
  • Futurists, technocrats and sci-fi enthusiasts
  • Students of ethics and biology

33
Oxygen

Oxygen

Nick Lane
The Molecule That Made the World
4.3 (26 ratings)

What's Oxygen about?

Oxygen (2002) is a guide to the element that is so essential to our very existence that we sometimes forget it even exists. These blinks explain how oxygen enables and boosts life on earth while simultaneously threatening it.

Who should read Oxygen?

  • Anybody fascinated by the evolution of life on Earth
  • Anyone interested in biology, chemistry or physics

34
Decoding the World

Decoding the World

Po Bronson and Arvind Gupta
A Roadmap for the Questioner
4.0 (63 ratings)

What's Decoding the World about?

Decoding the World (2020) is a dive into the fascinating world of IndieBio, a biotechnology firm that’s determined to change the world for the better. The long-term health of both people and the planet are at stake – and not just because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Who should read Decoding the World?

  • Science fans excited by fascinating new developments
  • Futurists imagining what lies ahead
  • Philosophy enthusiasts wondering what to do in the modern world

35
The Book of Eels

The Book of Eels

Patrik Svensson
Our Enduring Fascination with the Most Mysterious Creature in the Natural World
4.4 (22 ratings)

What's The Book of Eels about?

The Book of Eels (2020) takes the reader on a zoological odyssey spanning thousands of years. It’s the story of the eel – a creature that has enthralled humanity with its strange and complex life cycle. Countless scientists have dedicated their careers to the enigma of this fish, which has evolved to undergo several metamorphoses over the course of its life and to endure a grueling migration across the Atlantic to breed. But the eel has proven to be an elusive creature, and there are still many secrets about its life that it seems intent on keeping to itself.

Who should read The Book of Eels?

  • Nature lovers who are fascinated by strange stories from the great outdoors
  • Fans of mysteries that stubbornly resist explanation 
  • Environmentalists concerned about humans’ effect on the future of the eel

36
Underbug

Underbug

Lisa Margonelli
An Obsessive Tale of Termites and Technology
4.6 (20 ratings)

What's Underbug about?

Underbug (2018) explores the fascinating world of a bug so unloved it might just beat cockroaches in an unpopularity contest – the termite. The result of years of research and interviews with biologists, entomologists, and geneticists, Lisa Margonelli’s study sets out to rescue the reputation of this underappreciated creature. Along the way she explores termites’ remarkable architectural powers, unpacks their strange relationship with a 250 million-year-old fungus, and shows how the microbes in their guts might just help us create a more sustainable future. 

Who should read Underbug?

  • Scientists  
  • Nature-lovers 
  • Amateur entomologists

37
Your Inner Fish

Your Inner Fish

Neil Shubin
A Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human Body
4.7 (16 ratings)

What's Your Inner Fish about?

Drawing on findings from paleontology, genetics and developmental biology, Your Inner Fish describes the evolutionary history of the human body, tracing it back to the fish. The author shows how studying fossils, genes and embryonic development can help us understand our complex evolutionary past.

Who should read Your Inner Fish?

●  Anyone who wants to know more about our evolutionary past
●  Anyone interested in genetics, developmental biology and paleontology
●  Anyone who wants to know how we can detect the inner fish in our bodies


38
Forensics

Forensics

Val McDermid
What Bugs, Burns, Prints, DNA, and More Tell Us About Crime
4.7 (16 ratings)

What's Forensics about?

Forensics (2014) provides an inside look at the morbid world of forensic investigation. Filled with fascinating history and anecdotes from real criminal cases, Forensics gives you a complete, compelling overview of everything that happens during the investigation of a crime scene.

Who should read Forensics?

  • Those interested in the history of forensic science
  • Aspiring criminal investigators
  • People who watch shows like CSI

39
Too Much of a Good Thing

Too Much of a Good Thing

Lee Goldman
How Four Key Survival Traits Are Now Killing Us
3.5 (11 ratings)

What's Too Much of a Good Thing about?

The human body evolved to allow us to survive in a world very different from the one we inhabit today. These blinks explain why we’re not suited to the modern world, and the health complications we’re suffering as a result.

Who should read Too Much of a Good Thing?

  • People suffering from obesity, high blood pressure, depression or coronary illnesses
  • Medical professionals
  • Anyone interested in genetics or evolution

40
Vaxxers

Vaxxers

Sarah Gilbert and Catherine Green
The Inside Story of the Oxford AstraZeneca Vaccine and the Race Against the Virus
4.3 (146 ratings)

What's Vaxxers about?

Vaxxers (2021) follows the race to develop a functional vaccine to curb the spread of the COVID-19 virus. Professor Sarah Gilbert and Dr. Catherine Green, of the University of Oxford, deliver captivating and informative insight into the process of designing, testing, and manufacturing the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine in record time. They recount exciting moments of innovation, as well as the hurdles faced along the way.

Who should read Vaxxers?

  • Anyone fascinated by vaccine development
  • Public health enthusiasts 
  • Futurists looking to prepare for the next big pandemic

41
The Violinist’s Thumb

The Violinist’s Thumb

Sam Kean
And Other Lost Tales of Love, War and Genius, as Written by Our Genetic Code
4.7 (15 ratings)

What's The Violinist’s Thumb about?

The Violinist’s Thumb is an exploration into DNA, the double-helix of life itself. The following blinks chronicle the scientific discoveries that led us to understand DNA and the major role it’s played in the emergence of life on earth.

Who should read The Violinist’s Thumb?

  • Anyone interested in genetics, evolution and the origin of life on earth
  • Anyone interested in the scientific discoveries that have led us to understand the importance of our DNA
  • Anyone interested in what the future of genetic engineering may hold

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