The best 29 Criminal Law books

Delve deeper into the complex world of criminal law with this comprehensive book list. From the principles of criminal justice to courtroom procedures, this selection offers a valuable resource for anyone interested in understanding the intricacies of the legal system.
Explore the theoretical and practical aspects of criminal law, including the investigation, prosecution, and defense of criminal acts. Whether you're a student, legal professional, or simply curious about the subject, this collection will provide you with valuable insights.

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1
Criminal Law Books: The Law of Self Defense by Andrew F. Branca

The Law of Self Defense

Andrew F. Branca

What's The Law of Self Defense about?

'The Law of Self Defense' by Andrew F. Branca delves deep into the legal intricacies of self-defense. This comprehensive guide provides valuable insight into the principles and practicalities of self-defense laws, offering real-life examples and actionable advice for individuals seeking to understand and protect their rights in potentially life-threatening situations.

Who should read The Law of Self Defense?


2
Criminal Law Books: Abolition Democracy by Angela Y. Davis

Abolition Democracy

Angela Y. Davis

What's Abolition Democracy about?

Abolition Democracy by Angela Y. Davis explores the relationship between democracy and the prison-industrial complex. Davis argues that true democracy cannot coexist with the current system of mass incarceration and calls for the abolition of prisons. She offers a thought-provoking analysis of the intersection of race, class, and punishment in the United States and presents a vision for a more just and equitable society.

Who should read Abolition Democracy?

  • Individuals interested in understanding the roots of racism and inequality
  • Activists and scholars seeking to challenge the prison industrial complex
  • Readers who want to explore alternative models of justice and community accountability

3
Criminal Law Books: The Killer Across the Table by John E. Douglas, Mark Olshaker

The Killer Across the Table

John E. Douglas, Mark Olshaker

What's The Killer Across the Table about?

The Killer Across the Table (2019) by John E. Douglas and Mark Olshaker is a chilling exploration of the minds of some of the world's most notorious criminals. Drawing on his extensive experience as an FBI criminal profiler, Douglas delves into the psychology of these individuals, offering valuable insights into their motives and methods. Through in-depth interviews and analysis, this book provides a fascinating and unsettling look at the dark side of humanity.

Who should read The Killer Across the Table?

  • Individuals interested in criminal psychology and profiling
  • True crime enthusiasts seeking insights into the minds of notorious killers
  • Professionals in law enforcement or forensic science looking to enhance their understanding of criminal behavior

4
Criminal Law Books: On Killing by Lt. Col. Dave Grossman

On Killing

Lt. Col. Dave Grossman

What's On Killing about?

On Killing by Lt. Col. Dave Grossman explores the psychological and physiological effects of killing in combat. Through extensive research and real-life accounts, Grossman examines the history and methods of training soldiers to overcome their natural resistance to taking another human's life. He also delves into the societal and ethical implications of warfare and the long-term impact on those who have participated in it.

Who should read On Killing?

  • Individuals interested in understanding the psychological and ethical aspects of killing
  • Professionals in fields such as law enforcement, military, or mental health
  • Those seeking insights into the effects of violence on individuals and society

5
Criminal Law Books: Are Prisons Obsolete? by Angela Y. Davis

Are Prisons Obsolete?

Angela Y. Davis

What's Are Prisons Obsolete? about?

Are Prisons Obsolete? by Angela Y. Davis challenges the notion that imprisonment is the most effective solution to crime. Davis discusses the history and purpose of prisons, their impact on society, and offers alternatives to the current system. This thought-provoking book encourages readers to rethink the way we approach justice and punishment.

Who should read Are Prisons Obsolete??

  • Individuals interested in understanding the history and problems of the prison system
  • Activists looking for ways to advocate for criminal justice reform
  • Policy makers and lawmakers seeking to make informed decisions about incarceration

6
Criminal Law Books: Why They Do It by Eugene Soltes

Why They Do It

Eugene Soltes

What's Why They Do It about?

Why They Do It by Eugene Soltes seeks to uncover the motivations and rationalizations behind white-collar crime. Through extensive interviews with convicted executives, Soltes delves into the psychological and ethical factors that lead seemingly successful individuals to engage in fraudulent and unethical behavior. This thought-provoking book challenges our assumptions about corporate misconduct and offers valuable insights into preventing such crimes in the future.

Who should read Why They Do It?

  • Entrepreneurs seeking to understand the psychology behind white-collar crime
  • Business professionals aiming to recognize warning signs and prevent unethical behavior
  • Students and academics studying corporate governance and ethical decision-making

7
Criminal Law Books: The War on Cops by Heather Mac Donald

The War on Cops

Heather Mac Donald

What's The War on Cops about?

The War on Cops by Heather Mac Donald challenges the narrative that law enforcement is the cause of racial disparities in the criminal justice system. Through extensive research and analysis, the book argues that proactive policing has been effective in reducing crime and saving lives, particularly in minority communities. It delves into the complexities of the issue and offers a thought-provoking perspective on the role of police in society.

Who should read The War on Cops?


8
Criminal Law Books: Rethinking Incarceration by Dominique DuBois Gilliard

Rethinking Incarceration

Dominique DuBois Gilliard

What's Rethinking Incarceration about?

Rethinking Incarceration by Dominique DuBois Gilliard challenges the traditional approach to criminal justice and offers a compelling argument for a more restorative and redemptive system. Through a combination of personal stories, historical analysis, and biblical interpretation, Gilliard calls for a shift away from punitive measures and towards rehabilitation and community-based solutions. This thought-provoking book invites readers to reconsider their views on incarceration and advocate for meaningful change.

Who should read Rethinking Incarceration?

  • Individuals interested in criminal justice reform and racial equality
  • Church leaders and community organizers looking to address mass incarceration
  • Those seeking a deeper understanding of the intersection of faith and justice

What's You Have the Right to Remain Innocent about?

You Have the Right to Remain Innocent by James Duane is a thought-provoking book that delves into the complexities of the criminal justice system. It challenges the notion that innocent people have nothing to fear from the police and provides valuable insights into how individuals can protect themselves from wrongful accusations and convictions. Through real-life examples and legal analysis, Duane empowers readers to understand their rights and make informed decisions when interacting with law enforcement.

Who should read You Have the Right to Remain Innocent?

  • Individuals who want to understand their rights when interacting with law enforcement
  • People who want to learn how to protect themselves from potential wrongful convictions
  • Those who are interested in civil liberties and criminal justice reform

10
Criminal Law Books: Exonerated by Dan Bongino

Exonerated

Dan Bongino

What's Exonerated about?

Exonerated by Dan Bongino delves into the controversial investigations surrounding the 2016 US presidential election. Through meticulous research and analysis, Bongino presents compelling evidence to challenge the narrative of collusion and obstruction of justice. This thought-provoking book sheds light on the truth behind the political turmoil and the attempts to undermine the presidency.

Who should read Exonerated?

  • Lovers of political thrillers and conspiracy theories
  • People interested in behind-the-scenes revelations about controversial events
  • Readers who enjoy books that challenge mainstream narratives and offer alternative perspectives

11
Criminal Law Books: Understanding Criminal Law by Joshua Dressler

What's Understanding Criminal Law about?

Understanding Criminal Law by Joshua Dressler provides a comprehensive overview of the principles and concepts that form the foundation of criminal law. It delves into topics such as the elements of a crime, criminal responsibility, and various defenses. With clear explanations and real-life examples, this book is an essential resource for anyone seeking to grasp the complexities of criminal law.

Who should read Understanding Criminal Law?

  • Law students seeking a comprehensive understanding of criminal law
  • Legal professionals looking to refresh their knowledge of criminal law principles
  • Individuals interested in learning about the nuances of criminal law and its application in real-life cases

12
Criminal Law Books: The Condemnation of Blackness by Khalil Gibran Muhammad

The Condemnation of Blackness

Khalil Gibran Muhammad

What's The Condemnation of Blackness about?

The Condemnation of Blackness by Khalil Gibran Muhammad explores the historical roots of racial stereotypes and the criminalization of black people in America. Through meticulous research and analysis, Muhammad uncovers how these harmful narratives have shaped public policy and perpetuated systemic racism. This thought-provoking book challenges readers to confront the legacy of racial injustice and its ongoing impact on society.

Who should read The Condemnation of Blackness?

  • Readers interested in the history of racial discrimination and its impact on society
  • Individuals looking to deepen their understanding of systemic racism in the United States
  • Activists and advocates working towards racial justice and equality

13
Criminal Law Books: Criminology For Dummies by Steven Briggs

What's Criminology For Dummies about?

Criminology For Dummies by Steven Briggs provides an accessible introduction to the complex field of criminology. Through easy-to-understand language and real-world examples, the book explores various aspects of crime, including its causes, theories, and impact on society. Whether you're a student or simply curious about the subject, this book offers valuable insights into the study of crime and criminal behavior.

Who should read Criminology For Dummies?

  • Individuals interested in understanding the causes and consequences of criminal behavior
  • Students studying criminology or criminal justice
  • Law enforcement professionals looking to enhance their understanding of crime

14
Criminal Law Books: The Tools of Argument by Joel P. Trachtman

The Tools of Argument

Joel P. Trachtman

What's The Tools of Argument about?

The Tools of Argument by Joel P. Trachtman provides a comprehensive guide to mastering the art of persuasive reasoning. Through clear explanations and real-world examples, the book equips readers with the essential tools and techniques needed to construct compelling arguments and effectively defend their positions. Whether you're a student, professional, or simply interested in the power of persuasion, this book offers valuable insights into the principles of logic and rhetoric.

Who should read The Tools of Argument?

  • Law students and aspiring lawyers looking to improve their argumentation skills
  • Professionals who need to effectively present and defend their ideas
  • Anyone interested in understanding the principles of persuasive communication

15
Criminal Law Books: Stalling for Time by Gary Noesner

Stalling for Time

Gary Noesner

What's Stalling for Time about?

Stalling for Time by Gary Noesner is a gripping memoir that takes you inside the world of hostage negotiation. Noesner shares his experiences and insights from his time at the FBI, offering a unique perspective on high-stakes situations and the art of communication under pressure. It's a fascinating read that will keep you on the edge of your seat.

Who should read Stalling for Time?

  • Individuals interested in the field of hostage negotiation and law enforcement
  • Readers who enjoy true crime and stories of high-stakes negotiations
  • Those looking to gain insights into the psychology of conflict resolution and communication under pressure

16
Criminal Law Books: Taken for Granted by Gianno Caldwell

Taken for Granted

Gianno Caldwell

What's Taken for Granted about?

Taken for Granted by Gianno Caldwell delves into the complexities of race, politics, and identity in America. Drawing from his own experiences growing up in inner-city Chicago and his journey to becoming a conservative political commentator, Caldwell challenges assumptions and offers thought-provoking insights on how we can bridge the divide and create a more inclusive society.

Who should read Taken for Granted?

  • Individuals seeking a fresh perspective on political and societal issues
  • Readers who want to understand the impact of policies on marginalized communities
  • Those interested in personal stories of overcoming adversity and finding success

17
Criminal Law Books: The Road to Wigan Pier by George Orwell

The Road to Wigan Pier

George Orwell

What's The Road to Wigan Pier about?

The Road to Wigan Pier is a powerful exploration of the harsh living and working conditions faced by the working class in northern England during the 1930s. George Orwell combines personal experiences and investigative journalism to expose the social and economic inequalities of the time, while also offering his own thoughts on socialism and the potential for societal change.

Who should read The Road to Wigan Pier?

  • Readers who are interested in social and economic inequalities
  • Those seeking to understand the lives of working-class individuals in industrial England
  • Anyone looking to explore the themes of poverty, class struggle, and political ideologies

18
Criminal Law Books: Blood in the Water by Heather Ann Thompson

Blood in the Water

Heather Ann Thompson

What's Blood in the Water about?

Blood in the Water by Heather Ann Thompson provides a detailed and gripping account of the 1971 Attica prison uprising and its tragic aftermath. Drawing on extensive research and interviews with survivors, Thompson reveals the brutal realities of the prison system and the fight for justice in the face of overwhelming odds. This book exposes the systemic issues that continue to plague the American criminal justice system.

Who should read Blood in the Water?

  • Readers interested in social justice, civil rights, and prison reform
  • Individuals who want to understand the complexities of the Attica prison uprising and its aftermath
  • History enthusiasts who appreciate in-depth research and compelling storytelling

19
Criminal Law Books: No Visible Bruises by Rachel Louise Snyder

No Visible Bruises

Rachel Louise Snyder

What's No Visible Bruises about?

No Visible Bruises by Rachel Louise Snyder delves into the silent epidemic of domestic violence. Through meticulous research and powerful storytelling, the book examines the complexity of intimate partner violence and its far-reaching effects. It sheds light on the societal and systemic factors that perpetuate abuse, while also offering insights into how we can work towards prevention and support for survivors.

Who should read No Visible Bruises?

  • Individuals seeking to understand the complexities of domestic violence
  • Advocates, activists, and professionals working in the field of domestic violence
  • Those looking to educate themselves and others about the signs and effects of abuse

20

What's Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of Law about?

Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of Law is a comprehensive reference book that provides clear and concise definitions of legal terms and concepts. It is an essential resource for law students, legal professionals, and anyone seeking to understand the language of the law. With over 10,000 entries, this book covers a wide range of legal topics and is a valuable tool for navigating the complexities of the legal system.

Who should read Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of Law?

  • Law students or anyone studying legal terminology
  • Legal professionals looking to expand their knowledge and understanding of legal language
  • Individuals involved in legal proceedings or contracts who want to clarify specific terms

21
Criminal Law Books: Papillon by Henri Charriere

Papillon

Henri Charriere

What's Papillon about?

Papillon is a captivating memoir by Henri Charrière, recounting his daring escape from the brutal penal colony of Devil's Island in French Guiana. With vivid detail and unwavering determination, Charrière takes us on an unforgettable journey through the harsh realities of imprisonment and his relentless pursuit of freedom.

Who should read Papillon?

  • Readers who enjoy true stories of survival and human resilience
  • Those interested in exploring the harsh realities of the French penal system in the mid-20th century
  • Individuals who appreciate vivid and detailed accounts of personal experiences

What's Buried Beneath the Boarding House about?

Buried Beneath the Boarding House by Ryan Green takes readers on a chilling journey into the dark secrets of a seemingly ordinary boarding house. Uncovering the true story of Dorothea Puente, a charming landlady with a sinister side, this book delves into the horrifying murders she committed and the unsuspecting tenants who fell victim to her deadly schemes.

Who should read Buried Beneath the Boarding House?

  • True crime enthusiasts looking for a captivating and unsettling read
  • Readers interested in the psychology and motives of serial killers
  • Individuals who enjoy exploring the darker aspects of human nature and criminal investigations

23
Criminal Law Books: The Innocent Man by John Grisham

The Innocent Man

John Grisham

What's The Innocent Man about?

The Innocent Man by John Grisham is a gripping true crime story that exposes the flaws in the American justice system. It follows the case of Ron Williamson, a man wrongfully convicted of murder, and delves into the investigation, trial, and eventual exoneration. Through meticulous research and compelling storytelling, Grisham sheds light on the devastating consequences of wrongful convictions.

Who should read The Innocent Man?

  • Individuals interested in wrongful convictions and miscarriages of justice
  • Readers who enjoy legal thrillers and true crime stories
  • Those curious about the flaws and biases within the criminal justice system

24
Criminal Law Books: American Prison by Shane Bauer

American Prison

Shane Bauer

What's American Prison about?

American Prison by Shane Bauer is a gripping exposé that takes readers inside a private prison in Louisiana. Through his own experiences working as a guard and extensive investigative reporting, Bauer reveals the shocking realities of the for-profit prison system in the United States. It is a thought-provoking and eye-opening book that challenges our understanding of incarceration and raises important questions about justice and reform.

Who should read American Prison?

  • Readers interested in understanding the flaws of the American prison system
  • Individuals curious about the inner workings of for-profit prisons
  • Those who want to advocate for criminal justice reform

25
Criminal Law Books: Chokehold by Paul Butler

Chokehold

Paul Butler

What's Chokehold about?

Chokehold by Paul Butler delves into the systemic issues of racial bias and injustice within the American criminal justice system. Through personal anecdotes and legal analysis, Butler challenges the status quo and offers thought-provoking solutions to address the disproportionate impact on black individuals. This eye-opening book sheds light on the urgent need for reform.

Who should read Chokehold?

  • Anyone seeking to understand the systemic issues of race and criminal justice in the United States
  • Individuals who are passionate about social justice and reforming the legal system
  • Readers who appreciate thought-provoking and well-researched non-fiction books

26
Criminal Law Books: The Return of Martin Guerre by Natalie Zemon Davis

The Return of Martin Guerre

Natalie Zemon Davis

What's The Return of Martin Guerre about?

The Return of Martin Guerre by Natalie Zemon Davis is a captivating historical account of a famous case of imposture in 16th-century France. Through meticulous research and vivid storytelling, Davis unravels the mystery surrounding a man who assumes the identity of Martin Guerre and explores the complexities of identity, community, and the pursuit of justice.

Who should read The Return of Martin Guerre?

  • History enthusiasts interested in 16th-century France
  • Readers who enjoy true crime and mystery stories
  • People curious about the complexities of identity and deception

27
Criminal Law Books: A Civil Action by Jonathan Harr

A Civil Action

Jonathan Harr

What's A Civil Action about?

A Civil Action by Jonathan Harr is a gripping non-fiction book that delves into the true story of a legal case against two major corporations accused of polluting a town's water supply. Through meticulous research and compelling storytelling, Harr explores the complexities of environmental law and the pursuit of justice in the face of corporate power.

Who should read A Civil Action?

  • People interested in environmental law and corporate malpractice
  • Readers who enjoy legal thrillers and courtroom drama
  • Anyone curious about the complexities and challenges of civil litigation

28
Criminal Law Books: Innocent Victims by Scott Whisnant

Innocent Victims

Scott Whisnant

What's Innocent Victims about?

Innocent Victims by Scott Whisnant is a gripping true crime book that delves into the tragic murders of a mother and her two young daughters. Through meticulous research and interviews, Whisnant uncovers the shocking details of the crime and the wrongful conviction of an innocent man. This compelling narrative sheds light on the flaws of the justice system and the devastating impact it can have on the lives of those wrongfully accused.

Who should read Innocent Victims?

  • Readers who enjoy true crime stories
  • People interested in criminal justice and wrongful convictions
  • Individuals looking for insights into the flaws of the legal system

29
Criminal Law Books: Until You Are Dead by Julian Sher

Until You Are Dead

Julian Sher

What's Until You Are Dead about?

Until You Are Dead by Julian Sher is a gripping true crime book that delves into the case of Steven Truscott, a Canadian teenager who was wrongfully convicted of murder in 1959. Sher meticulously examines the flawed investigation and trial that led to Truscott's imprisonment, as well as his eventual fight for justice and exoneration decades later.

Who should read Until You Are Dead?

  • Readers interested in true crime and wrongful convictions
  • Those who enjoy investigative journalism and uncovering the truth
  • Individuals who want to understand the flaws and limitations of the criminal justice system

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