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Unselfie

Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About-Me World

By Michele Borba
13-minute read
Audio available
Unselfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About-Me World by Michele Borba

Unselfie (2016) takes a close look at the human experience of empathy – why it’s declining, what it means for our children and how we can get them back on the right track. These blinks explain the many benefits of empathy and outline several practical ways to help turn your child into a caring and altruistic future leader.

  • Parents of toddlers, teenagers and everyone in between
  • Educators and caregivers who want to provide kids with a moral compass
  • School administrators interested in ending bullying

Michele Borba is an internationally renowned author who specializes in moral education and nurturing child resilience. She has been featured in the New York Times, has appeared on NBC’s Dateline and BBC Radio’s Today and is the author of 22 books.

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Unselfie

Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About-Me World

By Michele Borba
  • Read in 13 minutes
  • Audio & text available
  • Contains 8 key ideas
Unselfie: Why Empathetic Kids Succeed in Our All-About-Me World by Michele Borba
Synopsis

Unselfie (2016) takes a close look at the human experience of empathy – why it’s declining, what it means for our children and how we can get them back on the right track. These blinks explain the many benefits of empathy and outline several practical ways to help turn your child into a caring and altruistic future leader.

Key idea 1 of 8

Evidence shows that empathy is decreasing among young people, while narcissism is on the rise.

Did you know that “selfie” was voted word of the year in 2014 by Oxford Dictionaries? The decision was made following a 17,000 percent increase in the word’s usage over the previous year.

This obsession with photos of ourselves is symptomatic of an all-about-me society that’s ruled by ego, in which everybody wants to be the center of attention. Psychologists are even in agreement that empathy is on the decline, while narcissism among young adults is steadily rising.

Just take psychologist Sarah Konrath, whose University of Michigan, Ann Arbor team considered 72 behavioral studies among college students over the last three decades. Their results, which were published in Personality and Sociology Review, paint a disturbing picture.

They found that students today are 40 percent less empathetic than their predecessors were 30 years ago. In addition, rates of narcissistic behavior, including selfishness, an inflated sense of self-importance and a tremendous need for admiration, have soared by a whopping 58 percent!

Or consider a Gallup poll that found that while only 12 percent of teenagers in the 1950s agreed with the statement “I am very important,” that figure has hovered around 80 percent since the late 1980s.

The drop in empathy is also made abundantly clear by the rise in bullying among school children. After all, children who bully others do so by dehumanizing their victims and failing to see life from their perspective, which is why soaring rates of bullying are a strong indicator of decreasing empathy.

And although children have always been mean to one another, recent studies have found that bullying has reached an all-time high in recent years. One study showed a 52-percent increase over a mere four years. Another study determined that children as young as three years old were engaging in bullying behavior.

But what’s perhaps most disturbing is that one out of every five middle schoolers reports considering suicide because of peer cruelty.

We can thus see that children today are much more self-absorbed than previous generations were at the same age – but that doesn’t mean that they have to stay this way. In the next blinks, you’ll learn how to transform this mindset.

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