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Twitter Is Not A Strategy

Rediscovering the Art of Brand Marketing

By Tom Doctoroff
12-minute read
Twitter Is Not A Strategy: Rediscovering the Art of Brand Marketing by Tom Doctoroff

Twitter Is Not A Strategy cuts through the mess of hashtags and handles to get to the meat of effective marketing, outlining the core principles that make up the foundation of a successful company brand. Although social media is all the rage, this book shows that traditional marketing still matters, and that the secret to success is – as it always has been – having a good brand idea.

  • Anyone interested in how companies create and promote brands
  • Anyone who questions whether “traditional” advertising techniques still matter
  • Business owners or executives in charge of company marketing efforts

Tom Doctoroff is the chief executive office of J. Walter Thompson in the Asia Pacific region. With over 20 years of marketing experience, Doctoroff has shaped some of the world’s biggest brands, such as Nestle and Microsoft.

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Twitter Is Not A Strategy

Rediscovering the Art of Brand Marketing

By Tom Doctoroff
  • Read in 12 minutes
  • Contains 7 key ideas
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Twitter Is Not A Strategy: Rediscovering the Art of Brand Marketing by Tom Doctoroff
Synopsis

Twitter Is Not A Strategy cuts through the mess of hashtags and handles to get to the meat of effective marketing, outlining the core principles that make up the foundation of a successful company brand. Although social media is all the rage, this book shows that traditional marketing still matters, and that the secret to success is – as it always has been – having a good brand idea.

Key idea 1 of 7

A product needs a strong brand to inspire customer loyalty and encourage repeat purchases.

What do you think of when you see Nike’s swoosh? You might associate it with joy, or coolness, or perhaps freedom of motion.

These associations are the foundation of Nike’s brand image – the key to Nike’s corporate success.

But what is a brand, exactly?

The idea of a “brand” comes from ancient Egypt, where the skin of cattle was burned – or branded – with a particular mark to show to whom the cattle belonged.

Corporate branding, of course, works differently. A company uses a brand to make its products stand out from competing products, with the goal of creating a dedicated base of repeat customers.

For example, Procter & Gamble in the late 1800s used mostly generic names and packaging. But with the invention of a new soap executives thought exceptional, they decided to give it a special brand.

So instead of calling it a “white soap bar” which was usual, the company christened the product “Ivory,” to suggest its mild, long-lasting qualities. And thanks to the company’s successful branding campaign, annual Ivory sales exceeded $3 million!

But why is branding such an effective tool? In essence, a brand can inspire customer loyalty.

Apple built a strong brand centered around exceptionally well-designed computer hardware. Even though competitor Samsung might offer better value for the money, many people buy Apple’s more-expensive iPhones as they believe in the company’s brand.

Branding too can be a life raft amid a public relations disaster. In the early 1980s, bottles of the painkiller Tylenol from Johnson & Johnson were tampered with and laced with cyanide, a deadly poison. Seven people died; a country-wide recall pulled product off the shelves and the company’s market share plummeted.

Yet within a year,  Johnson & Johnson had recovered nearly all of its losses, thanks to its hands-on, transparent crisis management at the time. The company communicated the situation to customers in a way that aligned their brand image with values like “tender” and “caring.”

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