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The Biology of Belief

Unleashing the Power of Consciousness, Matter and Miracles

By Bruce H. Lipton
16-minute read
Audio available
The Biology of Belief: Unleashing the Power of Consciousness, Matter and Miracles by Bruce H. Lipton

The Biology of Belief describes a revolutionary change in biology and explores a new approach to the connection between mind and matter. Using easily accessible examples and explanations, Lipton offers a radical alternative to our understanding of the influence of genes in determining our behavior and identity.

  • Anyone interested in new developments in biology
  • Anyone curious about the influence we can have on our genes
  • Anyone interested in examples of modern scientific revolutions

Stem cell biologist Bruce H. Lipton, Ph.D., is a key figure in new biology. Known for his work combining science and spirituality, he has taught Cell Biology at the University of Wisconsin and conducted leading-edge research at Stanford University’s School of Medicine. In 2009, he received the Goi Peace Award.

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The Biology of Belief

Unleashing the Power of Consciousness, Matter and Miracles

By Bruce H. Lipton
  • Read in 16 minutes
  • Audio & text available
  • Contains 10 key ideas
The Biology of Belief: Unleashing the Power of Consciousness, Matter and Miracles by Bruce H. Lipton
Synopsis

The Biology of Belief describes a revolutionary change in biology and explores a new approach to the connection between mind and matter. Using easily accessible examples and explanations, Lipton offers a radical alternative to our understanding of the influence of genes in determining our behavior and identity.

Key idea 1 of 10

Cooperation rather than competition should be the central tenet in our theory of evolution.

Who discovered the idea of evolution? Charles Darwin? You might think so, but you’d be wrong. It was actually discovered a few decades before Darwin, by a French biologist named Jean-Baptiste Lamarck.

Lamarck’s idea of evolution, however, was slightly different than Darwin’s.

Unlike Darwin, who viewed evolution as a battle between species, Lamarck conceptualized evolution in kinder terms. To Lamarck, cooperation between species and individuals was extremely important to evolution.

And unlike Darwinist theory which describes random genetic mutations, some of which help an individual survive in their environment and in turn encourage evolutionary progress, Lamarck suggested that species evolve as they learn to fit their surroundings.

And in many ways, Lamarck’s view is closer to our current understanding of evolution.

For example, when we look at how the immune system functions, we can see how organisms adapt to their environment and pass this knowledge onto their offspring.

When a virus enters our body, our antibodies fight it. When antibodies are successful, they “remember” the virus and how to kill it. This memory is then passed on to the antibody’s daughter cells.

Lamarck’s notion that organisms often cooperate, rather than constantly fight, can also be demonstrated by modern scientific research. And we are not just referring to members of the same species. There are many symbiotic relationships in nature, where different species appear to cooperate with one another.

For example, our digestive system contains billions of bacteria to help it function. Without these bacteria, we wouldn’t be able to digest the food we eat.

Furthermore, interspecies cooperation even affects genes.

Science has revealed that genes don't necessarily have to be passed on through reproduction from individual to individual, but that they can be shared with members of other species.

The following blinks will show how our understanding of the functioning of human cell biology confirms this Lamarckian idea of cooperation.

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