Open in the App Open in the App Open in the App
Get the key ideas from

In Sheep’s Clothing

Understanding and Dealing with Manipulative People

By George Simon Jr., PhD
12-minute read
Audio available
In Sheep’s Clothing: Understanding and Dealing with Manipulative People by George Simon Jr., PhD

In Sheep’s Clothing (1996) reveals the aggressive, undercover agenda of manipulative individuals, whose covert tactics would otherwise remain hidden. These blinks offers you tools to become aware of, prepare for and deal with the tricks used by manipulative colleagues, family members and friends.

  • People who are overly anxious and fearful of social rejection
  • People who believe they might be in a relationship with a manipulator
  • People who want to learn how to fight back against manipulators

George Simon Jr., PhD is a clinical psychologist from Texas who has spent the last 30 years studying the behavior of manipulative personalities and counselling their victims. He is also the author of Character Disturbance: the Phenomenon of Our Age (2011).

Go Premium and get the best of Blinkist

Upgrade to Premium now and get unlimited access to the Blinkist library. Read or listen to key insights from the world’s best nonfiction.

Upgrade to Premium

What is Blinkist?

The Blinkist app gives you the key ideas from a bestselling nonfiction book in just 15 minutes. Available in bitesize text and audio, the app makes it easier than ever to find time to read.

Discover
3,000+ top
nonfiction titles

Get unlimited access to the most important ideas in business, investing, marketing, psychology, politics, and more. Stay ahead of the curve with recommended reading lists curated by experts.

Join Blinkist to get the key ideas from

In Sheep’s Clothing

Understanding and Dealing with Manipulative People

By George Simon Jr., PhD
  • Read in 12 minutes
  • Audio & text available
  • Contains 7 key ideas
In Sheep’s Clothing: Understanding and Dealing with Manipulative People by George Simon Jr., PhD
Synopsis

In Sheep’s Clothing (1996) reveals the aggressive, undercover agenda of manipulative individuals, whose covert tactics would otherwise remain hidden. These blinks offers you tools to become aware of, prepare for and deal with the tricks used by manipulative colleagues, family members and friends.

Key idea 1 of 7

Everyone fights, but manipulators fight aggressively, without concern for their opponents.

We’ve all seen it: someone makes a subtle put-down in a social gathering that manages to be hurtful without making the perpetrator look bad. Why would someone even do that?

Some people, manipulators, like to fight others and put them down in order to make themselves look better.

This isn’t to say that manipulators are the only people who engage in bad behavior; indeed, we all fight from time to time.

Assertive fighting for our legitimate needs is often necessary and constructive – as long as we respect others in the process. For example, football players have to compete against each other to win the game, but do so within the rules.

Another example can be found in politics, where ideas and personalities clash, and the best candidates with the best ideas end up being elected – at least that’s the idea.

So how are manipulators any different from the rest of us? The difference is that people with manipulative personalities fight aggressively, pushing their own agenda forward without any regard for other people’s feelings, rights or interests.

The reason why is simple: manipulators have an impaired conscience. Unlike the rest of us, they’re completely unable to see beyond their own self-interest.

Whereas most of us will conform to social rules (such as not intentionally upsetting people), manipulators see this deference to social norms as an act of submission, and will likely view these norms as threats to their self-interest.

For example, manipulative parents who pressure their children to perform at a high level in school or sports, without any concern for their child’s needs and wants or the opinions of teachers and school staff, are more concerned with their own desires than the way their actions will affect their child. They are actively seeking the status that comes with being the parent of a high-performing student.

Key ideas in this title

No time to
read?

Pssst. Sign up to your secret to success: key ideas from top nonfiction in just 15 minutes.
Created with Sketch.